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Ukrainian mother who’s been brought together with her child, 11, in the wake of sending him to Slovakia alone with simply a visa and telephone number says she was ‘apprehensive’ yet trusted the ‘benevolence’ of outsiders would guard him

Hasan's brother, Mukhammad, left, said he was scared for his younger brother because he could not always reach him

Hasan’s brother, Mukhammad, left, said he was scared for his younger brother because he could not always reach him

Hasan Pisecka, 11, headed out from Ukraine to Slovakia without anyone else to escape struggle
With simply telephone number on his hand, rejoined with more seasoned kin in Bratislava
Mother Júlia Pisecká said she put confidence in the Ukrainian individuals as left behind him
Talking on GMG, family required a restricted air space over Ukraine to save country
The mother of a 11-year-old kid who traveled solo from Ukraine to Slovakia has uncovered how her confidence in the consideration of outsiders assisted her adapt to the appalling choice to allow her child to make the excursion without anyone else.

Recently, Hasan Pisecká crossed the country with just a plastic sack, his visa, and his mom’s phone number wrote on his hand, in a story that contacted the hearts of individuals from around the world.
His mom Júlia Pisecká, a widow, stayed in their old neighborhood of Zaporizhzhia, where Russian soldiers struck a thermal energy station toward the beginning of March, to keep really focusing on her older and stationary mother who couldn’t escape.

Addressing Richard Madeley and Susanna Reid from Bratislava on the present show, in the wake of rejoining with her family, Júlia uncovered she was

‘apprehensive’

about sending Hasan all alone.

However, she said she put her confidence in the ‘graciousness’ of the Ukrainian public and volunteers as she put Hasan on a train to the nation’s line with Slovakia.
Júlia made sense of she was ‘apprehensive for Hasan’s life’ after Russian soldiers drew nearer to the Zaporizhzhia atomic plant toward the beginning of March.

Deciphering for her mom, Hasan’s more seasoned sister made sense of that she was

‘exceptionally apprehensive’s on the grounds that ‘her child is the most youthful in the family and she has never sent him to some place without help from anyone else, so it was truly challenging for her.’

For Hasan’s kin, who were at that point in Slovakia, the circumstance was tense as they held back to know about their more youthful sibling.

His sister made sense of she realized Hasan was coming, and that they had the option to now and again convey through telephone, notwithstanding, on the grounds that his telephone had low battery, they needed to go for extensive stretches of time without talking.

Hasan travelled for 600 miles from Ukraine to Slovakia with his passport, a plastic bag and a number scribbled by his mother on his hand

Hasan travelled for 600 miles from Ukraine to Slovakia with his passport, a plastic bag and a number scribbled by his mother on his hand

‘When the police called me and said Hasan is almost here, it was really relaxed for us,’

she said, smiling.

Hasan’s brother Mohamed said he had a scarier exchange with his younger brother, who called him to say he was on his way and scared, saying he didn’t know if he would make it to Slovakia or not.

But asked by Richard if he ever feared something would happen to him and deter him from completing the journey, Hasan put on a proud face.

‘He wasn’t concerned, he was confident that he would do it great,’

his sister translated.

Richard Madeley and Susanna Reid listened as Hasan's family spoke of the hard journey to Bratislava

Richard Madeley and Susanna Reid listened as Hasan’s family spoke of the hard journey to Bratislava
Viewers were impressed with Hasan and his siblings, praising their bravery and their incredible level of English

Viewers were impressed with Hasan and his siblings, praising their bravery and their incredible level of English

Júlia also said she wouldn’t have send Hasan on his own if she hasn’t been confident he could make the journey.

‘She believes in our people and Ukrainian people and the people in the whole world, because every volunteer is very kind,’

her daughter explained.

Hasan’s siblings echoed their mother’s word of gratitude towards volunteers and the British people who sent donations to Ukraine.

Hasan’s sister shed a light on the family’s new life away from Ukraine.

‘I’m very upset that I can’t right now message my friends because they don’t always have Internet, or even if I want to go talk, I can’t message them and it’s very sad to me,’

she said.

11-year-old boy speaks of his incredible journey out of Ukraine
Hasan's brother, Mukhammad, left, said he was scared for his younger brother because he could not always reach him
Hasan’s brother, Mukhammad, left, said he was scared for his younger brother because he could not always reach him

‘Because I should start from zero, make new friends, learn the language, it is too difficult for me. I want to have a place where I will be always, like my home, not always moving,’

she said.

Her brother Mohamed agreed, saying: ‘I too was upset at the start, I left my friends and relatives in Ukraine and come to Slovakia, it was very uncomfortable, they are very different people.

‘But now all my friends call me because the situation is better because our soldiers are very good and brave,’

he added.

Júlia had scribbled the phone number of Hasan's siblings on his hand to help him through his travels

Júlia had scribbled the phone number of Hasan’s siblings on his hand to help him through his travels
The 11-year-old's mother praised the volunteers who helped Hasan reach his destination safely

The 11-year-old’s mother praised the volunteers who helped Hasan reach his destination safely

‘I think confident that I will return to Ukraine, I am very proud I’m Ukrainian and very like my country,’ his sister added.

Hasan ended the interview by addressing the camera in perfect English.

‘Thanks for all the people who helped me, but there is a lot of Ukrainian people still in danger. Please save Ukraine, close the sky,’

he said, calling for a no fly zone over this country.

Viewers were moved by the family’s story, and deeply impressed with the level of English of the children, who were able to translate for Júlia and Hasan.

‘Wow watching Hasan’s family being reunited was emotional. So happy for them,’

one said.

‘Such brave, clever children’

another said.

‘Wow their English is incredible,’

one wrote.

‘Hasan’s English is superb for an eleven year old,’

one said.

The family were reunited on 17th March in Slovakia when Júlia crossed the border herself with her mother, 10 days after Hasan completed the journey.

Authorities made sure Hasan made it home after he travelled to the border of Ukraine with Slovakia

Authorities made sure Hasan made it home after he travelled to the border of Ukraine with Slovakia
The world swooned after Slovakian police helped Júlia reunite with Hasan after his brave journey

The world swooned after Slovakian police helped Júlia reunite with Hasan after his brave journey

At the time, the Ukrainian mother said:

‘the train ride out of Ukraine ‘was very difficult’ but ‘we had to escape so our family could be back together’ as she admitted ‘we have to start from scratch. We lost everything we’ve had but we’re healthy.’

Hassan took a number of trains travelling west across to the Slovakian border, where he was spotted by officials who were struck by his

‘smile, fearlessness and determination, worthy of a true hero’.

They helped him reach the other side, where relatives were phoned and came to collect him. It is unclear when Hassan’s siblings left for Slovakia.

A post on Facebook describing Hassan’s journey said: ‘Volunteers took care of him, took him warm and provided him with food and drink, which they packed for the next trip.

‘Thanks to the number on his hand and a piece of paper in his waist, he managed to contact his loved ones, who came for him later, and the whole story ended well.’

Hasan, centre, with Julia, his three sisters and two brothers, as well as the family dog, all made it safely in Slovakia

Hasan, centre, with Julia, his three sisters and two brothers, as well as the family dog, all made it safely in Slovakia

Hours after the boy – whose relatives in Bratislava were contacted – reached safety, his mother Júlia Pisecká explained that her son was able to reach the border by train, in a video shared in a Facebook post by the Police of the Slovak Republic.

In the clip she added: ‘I am a widow and I have more children. I want to thank the Slovak customs and volunteers who took care of my son and helped him cross the border.

‘I am grateful you have saved my child’s life. Next to my town is a nuclear power plant that the Russians are shooting at. I couldn’t leave my mother, she can’t move on her own. People with a big heart live in your small country.’

Hassan and his four older siblings in Slovakia later spoke to Good Morning Britain of their joy at being reunited. In a poignant moment, the boy said he

‘isn’t thinking about the future’ and is happy to be ‘safe’.

‘He says the most important is to be in the place where he has family,’

his older sister said, translating Hassan’s words.

‘He likes this city because it’s safe. He doesn’t know about the future because he doesn’t know about the situation in Ukraine. He is not thinking about the future, he just wants to be with us.’

Asked about the scariest part of his journey, Hassan said it was travelling in a crowded train carriage surrounded by strangers.

‘The train was very, very full, there were 300 people in one carriage,’ his sister translated.

‘The kids and the people were sitting in the hall and everyone was talking in foreign languages and he wasn’t understanding so that was the scariest [part of the journey] for him.’

The siblings told how they had been worried for their youngest brother as he set out on his journey, noting that before the war he hadn’t even wanted to spend a night away at summer camp because he had been too afraid.

His sibling said:

‘I wasn’t believing it because he’s the youngest in our family and he can’t even make tea by himself so I was very, very worried when he was going to cross the border by himself. He doesn’t even visit summer camp because he can’t leave us.’

One of Hassan’s older brothers said the family are

‘very, very happy’ because ‘nothing happened to him, he is healthy’ and added jokingly: ‘And now I can tease him’.

In another post, the country’s interior minister wrote: ‘Little Hassan is only 11 years old, but in his way he has shown huge determination, courage and fearlessness that sometimes adults don’t have.

‘I am really very sorry for him and all the other children and their families who have to flee their country because of what is happening in Ukraine.’

Roman Mikulec added that Slovakia is ‘ready to help’ those fleeing Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

‘You will find security with us and if you ask for temporary protection, you will be provided with health care, social security, food, accommodation, education and job opportunities,’

he wrote on Facebook.

‘The fact that you ask for temporary protection in Slovakia does not mean that you will not be able to travel to other EU countries.’

Russian troops had attacked the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant, which is the largest in Europe and creates around 20 per cent of Ukraine’s electricity, in the early hours of Friday, March 4.

CCTV capturing a fierce gun battle between Putin’s men and Ukrainian defenders that sparked a fire in a six-storey training building just outside the main complex.

Moscow’s men then stopped firefighters getting to the building for several hours.

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