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Sovereigns adolescent shot while concentrating on says Mayor Adams doing ‘horrible’ work fighting firearm brutality

Queens 15-year-old Tamima Samira was shot by a stray bullet while studying in her home earlier this week.
Matthew McDermott for NY Post

Sovereigns adolescent shot while concentrating on says Mayor Adams doing ‘horrible’ work fighting firearm brutality

The Queens teen who was shot in the leg while getting her work done after a wanderer slug zoomed through her front entryway let The Post Thursday know that Mayor Eric Adams’ treatment of wrongdoing is funny.

Trusting it’s “simply going to deteriorate,” Tamima Samira, 15, said authorities are making a “horrible” work at taking care of the city’s firearm savagery during a meeting at her bloodstained St. Albans home, two days after she was shot in the leg in her lounge area.

“We ridicule [Mayor] Eric Adams constantly,” she expressed, alluding to her secondary school banter group. “It’s sort of insane his thought process simply getting vagrants off the metro will effectively help the crime percentages. It’s hard. There isn’t a lot of you can do to really dispose of these issues.”

The high schooler said she’s not even stunned that she turned into a casualty, given the city’s taking off crime percentage.

“Unfortunately we can say that we can anticipate it,” Samira said.

Queens 15-year-old Tamima Samira was shot by a stray bullet while studying in her home earlier this week.
Matthew McDermott for NY Post

The sophomore at Bronx High School of Science was sitting at her dining room table working on English assignments around 11 p.m. Tuesday when suddenly, a trio of suspects fired a barrage of bullets outside of her home on 113th Road near 205th Street, police said.

Around 20 bullets struck the front of the house — and one of them pierced Samira’s shin after it blasted through her front door.

“It felt like I was being electrocuted,”

Samira said of the moment she was shot.

Samira said she believes Mayor Eric Adams is doing a "terrible" job addressing gun violence in the city.
Samira said she believes Mayor Eric Adams is doing a “terrible” job addressing gun violence in the city.
Brigitte Stelzer for NY Post

“I looked down at my leg. There is blood on my leg. There is blood on my hand. Then [my mom] comes running over, she actually helps me get up.

“My mother was terrified. My father was terrified. My [10-year-old] brother was very confused. He had no idea what was going on.”

As Samira’s mother rushed to tie a tourniquet around the wound, her father called 911 and within minutes, she was en route to the hospital where she later underwent surgery to remove the bullet from her leg.

“It’s kind of crazy — because you don’t expect to get shot in the leg sitting at your dining table,”

Samira said.

“You might expect to get hit by someone on the subway, maybe even shot, but at your own home while you’re doing English homework at like 11? No, not really.”

About 20 bullets hit the front of Samira's St. Albans, Queens home on Tuesday.
About 20 bullets hit the front of Samira’s St. Albans, Queens, home on Tuesday.
Brigitte Stelzer for NY Post
The Bronx High School of Science student was hit in the shin.
The Bronx High School of Science student was hit in the shin while sitting at her dining room table.
Brigitte Stelzer for NY Post

The plucky teen said she’s “doing great” after she was discharged from the hospital Wednesday afternoon — when she posted a cheeky sign to her front door that referred to herself as

“the girl that got shot.”

“I’m going to be very, very honest, I was more so scared for, like, my family than I was for myself,”

said Samira, who now walks with a limp.

Adams and the NYPD have struggled to curb gun violence ahead of the hot summer months — traditionally the most violent in New York City.

A bullet hole in the family's front door.
A bullet hole in the family’s front door.
Brigitte Stelzer for NY Post
Samira's father Mohammad Hossain speaking to the press. The teen said her parents are both “terrified” and feel unsafe in their home.
Samira’s father Mohammad Hossain speaks to the press. The teen said her parents are both “terrified” and feel unsafe in their home.
Matthew McDermott for NY Post

So far this year, there have been 535 incidents of gunplay as of Sunday, according to the latest NYPD statistics. While those figures are down slightly from last year at just under 10%, this year’s pace is nearly double what they were before the pandemic, when the city saw a historic spike in gun violence.

In response, Adams has rolled out so-called Neighborhood Safety Teams, a revamped version of the controversial anti-crime units that were disbanded in 2020. And last week, Hizzoner appointed a “gun violence czar” to tackle the soaring rates. He’s also sought to tamp down crime in the subway system by cracking down on the homeless.

Samira said she’s well aware of the crime scourge rocking the city.

“It’s terrible that we see it happening every single day. Shootings happening all the time,”

she said.

“People have told me that it’s going to hit me later that I was like shot in the leg sitting at home, but I was like laughing 10 minutes after it happened.

“It’s crazy how we’re like desensitized to it, because I have been taking it … a lot better than my parents have, and that’s because I read the news. I had it happen to me and I was not shocked. I wasn’t. I really wasn’t.”

Samira, who is originally from Bangladesh and moved to Queens when she was a toddler, said her “terrified” parents now feel unsafe in their home but she feels secure knowing she wasn’t the intended target of the shooting.

Samira now plans to write her college admission essay on “gun violence from a first-person perspective.”
Samira now plans to write her college admission essay on “gun violence from a first-person perspective.”
Brigitte Stelzer for NY Post
“Being targeted is a problem though, hate crimes are at an all-time high. But for my safety, I’m not that concerned right now. I’m more concerned about everyone else who’s going through the same thing, except even worse because they’ve been targeted,”
she said.

But she also said criminals

“should be given the chance to rehabilitate, reform.”

“Maybe whoever did it was mentally unsound,”

Samira said.

“Instead of imprisoning them, maybe if you gave them the opportunity to get professional help, all the resources, maybe they could change for the better and I do believe that people can change, but I still believe that they should face the consequences of their actions.”

“Just because I’m not scared doesn’t mean I don’t think it’s terrible. Those people need to be caught, they need to be held up to the consequence standard and need to face whatever consequences they should be facing,”

she continued.

As for Samira’s future, she plans to study a STEM-related field at Columbia University and wants to figure out how to use her horrifying experience to effect change.

“You know what my college essay is going to be?”

she quipped.

“Gun violence from a first-person perspective.”

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