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How you can stop criminals taking your vehicle from your carport WITHOUT the keys: AA manager urges drivers to safeguard their coxcomb in a metal box after his £55,000 Lexus was taken – as drivers are cautioned HALF of vehicles are obvious targets

The supervisor of AA is empowering drivers to keep their keyless vehicle coxcombs inside a protected pocket, secured in a crate and afterward positioned inside a microwave after programmers took his significant other's £50,000 vehicle. Edmund King, one of Britain's driving driver specialists, said that hoodlums caught his better half Deidre's vehicle key sign and had the option to take the keyless Lexus. He currently keeps his vehicle coxcombs safely in a wired pocket that impedes the programmer's transmission, locked inside a red metal box, and afterward puts the case in a microwave at the precise back of his home. Presently he is empowering others to do likewise. Mr King said: 'We think the hoodlums came to the house at 11.45pm and utilized their PC gadget to open the vehicle and eliminate it with no crushing into the vehicle or anything. 'We didn't see it until the following morning, by which time it was likely in a compartment with its plates changed on out of the country.' He thinks that his home was marked out ahead of time, and criminals had the option to block the keyless vehicle signal when his better half left her vehicle at 6pm. The AA are currently encouraging vehicle proprietors to utilize comparable strategies utilized by Mr King after a survey of keyless vehicle proprietors observed that portion of their coxcombs are presented to burglary. Mr King said: 'Are we that sluggish that we can't press a button on a vital coxcomb or turn a key assuming it safeguards us.'

The supervisor of AA is empowering drivers to keep their keyless vehicle coxcombs inside a protected pocket, secured in a crate and afterward positioned inside a microwave after programmers took his significant other’s £50,000 vehicle. Edmund King, one of Britain’s driving driver specialists, said that hoodlums caught his better half Deidre’s vehicle key sign and had the option to take the keyless Lexus. He currently keeps his vehicle coxcombs safely in a wired pocket that impedes the programmer’s transmission, locked inside a red metal box, and afterward puts the case in a microwave at the precise back of his home. Presently he is empowering others to do likewise. Mr King said: ‘We think the hoodlums came to the house at 11.45pm and utilized their PC gadget to open the vehicle and eliminate it with no crushing into the vehicle or anything. ‘We didn’t see it until the following morning, by which time it was likely in a compartment with its plates changed on out of the country.’ He thinks that his home was marked out ahead of time, and criminals had the option to block the keyless vehicle signal when his better half left her vehicle at 6pm. The AA are currently encouraging vehicle proprietors to utilize comparable strategies utilized by Mr King after a survey of keyless vehicle proprietors observed that portion of their coxcombs are presented to burglary. Mr King said: ‘Are we that sluggish that we can’t press a button on a vital coxcomb or turn a key assuming it safeguards us.’

A survey of more than 4,000 UK drivers found that half are not taking any measures to secure they keyless cars from criminals who are using relay tactics to target them

A survey of more than 4,000 UK drivers found that half are not taking any measures to secure they keyless cars from criminals who are using relay tactics to target them

Mr King told the Telegraph: ‘We think the thieves came to the house at 11.45pm and used their computer device to unlock the car and remove it with no smashing into the car or anything.

‘We didn’t notice it until the next morning, by which time it was probably in a container with its plates changed on its way out of the country.’

He suspects that his house was staked out in advance, and thieves were able to intercept the keyless car signal when his wife parked her car at 6pm.

The AA are now urging car owners to employ similar tactics used by Mr King after a poll of keyless car owners found that half of their fobs are exposed to theft.

Mr King said:

‘Are we that lazy that we cannot press a button on a key fob or turn a key if it protects us.’

A faraday pouch has a wire lining which prevents thieves from intercepting the car fob signal
A man placing his keys inside a microwave, which can help block the interception signals from hackers

Using measures like a faraday pouch (left) and also the microwave trick (right) can help prevent car fob signals from being intercepted

Tin foil can also offer some protection for car fobs, but it can only be used for a short period of time as it will need to be replaced once it starts to tear.

They are also calling for manufacturers to inform motorists that their cars could be at risk.

Edmund King (pictured) is encouraging others to follow his tips after his car was stolen

Edmund King (pictured) is encouraging others to follow his tips after his car was stolen

The AA President also bought a £110 steering wheel lock and is considering a retractable security bollard and gates to stop his cars from being driven off the driveway.

The keyless crime wave has hit British motorists hard in recent years.

There were 101,198 vehicles stolen in England and Wales alone last year, recent Home Office data shows  – and many of these are thefts of cars with keyless technology using ‘relay’ tactics.

Despite sky-high levels of car crime and a constant news stream of CCTV footage showing motors being pinched from owners’ driveways in the dead of night, only half of drivers with cars featuring the tech use specialist devices and household items to block this type of theft, according to a new report.

While around half a million cars were being stolen annually at the height of the crime in the 90s, the volume of thefts have been increasing significantly in recent years.

Experts believe this is due to the higher cost of used cars and a lack of available parts, which has made stealing in-demand motors very lucrative for criminals.

Claims specialist, Claims Management & Adjusting, recently issued a freedom of information requests to the Home Office and was told that 72 per cent of stolen vehicles are never recovered, which is costing the insurance industry an estimated £1.5billion a year.

Yet half of owners of cars with keyless technology admit they are not taking any preventative measures to protect their vehicles.

Tin foil can also offer some protection for you car fob as long as it creates a seal, but will need to be replaced once it starts to tear

Tin foil can also offer some protection for you car fob as long as it creates a seal, but will need to be replaced once it starts to tear

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