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‘Granny, I’m everlastingly thankful to you’: Prince Harry issues explanation ‘commending the existence’ of the Queen – recalling their ‘loved recollections’ from whenever she first met his ‘sweetheart spouse’ Meghan to when she embraced her ‘cherished incredible grandkids’

His Majesty likewise looked moved as the Lord Speaker and the Commons Speaker communicated their sympathies and expressed: 'Profound as our melancholy is, we realize yours is more profound.' The King remained at a plated platform to address the group collected in Westminster Hall and said thanks to the many lawmakers and companions, including Liz Truss, Sir Keir Starmer and Boris Johnson, for their recognitions his mom. In his short, piercing discourse, Charles cited Shakespeare in his recognition for his 'cherished mother' as he tended to Parliament interestingly since becoming ruler, saying of the Queen: 'As Shakespeare said of the previous Queen Elizabeth, she was an example to all sovereigns residing.' He said: 'As I stand before you today, I can't resist the urge to feel the heaviness of history which encompasses us and which helps us to remember the fundamental parliamentary practices to which individuals from the two Houses devote yourselves with such private responsibility, to improve all of us.' Charles said the late Queen had 'set an illustration of sacrificial obligation which, with God's assistance and your guidance, I am settled dependably to follow.' He added: 'I'm profoundly thankful for addresses of sympathy, which so touchingly envelop how late sovereign dearest mother affected every one of us'. The many dignitaries then represented the public song of devotion, which moved the new King to tears on a day where he will be found openly with the Queen's final resting place without precedent for Scotland this evening.

His Majesty likewise looked moved as the Lord Speaker and the Commons Speaker communicated their sympathies and expressed: ‘Profound as our melancholy is, we realize yours is more profound.’ The King remained at a plated platform to address the group collected in Westminster Hall and said thanks to the many lawmakers and companions, including Liz Truss, Sir Keir Starmer and Boris Johnson, for their recognitions his mom. In his short, piercing discourse, Charles cited Shakespeare in his recognition for his ‘cherished mother’ as he tended to Parliament interestingly since becoming ruler, saying of the Queen: ‘As Shakespeare said of the previous Queen Elizabeth, she was an example to all sovereigns residing.’ He said: ‘As I stand before you today, I can’t resist the urge to feel the heaviness of history which encompasses us and which helps us to remember the fundamental parliamentary practices to which individuals from the two Houses devote yourselves with such private responsibility, to improve all of us.’ Charles said the late Queen had ‘set an illustration of sacrificial obligation which, with God’s assistance and your guidance, I am settled dependably to follow.’ He added: ‘I’m profoundly thankful for addresses of sympathy, which so touchingly envelop how late sovereign dearest mother affected every one of us’. The many dignitaries then represented the public song of devotion, which moved the new King to tears on a day where he will be found openly with the Queen’s final resting place without precedent for Scotland this evening.

The Duke of Sussex has honored his late grandma the Queen in an explanation today
He said thanks to her for her ‘sound exhortation’ and ‘irresistible grin’ and depicted her as a ‘directing compass’
Explanation delivered today is perceived to have been kept down a day keeping in mind 9/11 commemoration
Follow MailOnline’s liveblog today as additional occasions occur following the Queen’s passing, by clicking here
Full inclusion: Click here to see all our inclusion of the Queen’s passing
The Duke of Sussex today honored his late grandma the Queen as he lauded her ‘sound exhortation’ and ‘irresistible grin’ and called her a ‘directing compass’ through her obligation to administration and obligation.

In a proclamation delivered today, which is perceived to have been kept down a day keeping in mind the commemoration of the September 11 assaults, the Duke likewise said he needed to respect his dad toward the beginning of his rule as King.

Harry likewise alluded to his ‘sweetheart spouse’ Meghan Markle; said he was appreciative that the Queen had embraced her ‘adored incredible grandkids’; and discussed how he ‘valued’ the times enjoyed with the 96-year-old.

Today, King Charles III and Queen Consort Camilla were in London to visit Westminster Hall, where the two Houses of Parliament communicated their sympathies to the new ruler and his better half, with the King giving his answer.

Afterward, the casket conveying the Queen’s body will be taken from the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh to local St Giles’ Cathedral where her family and the gathering will go to a help of thanksgiving for her life.

What’s more, Harry said today: ‘In commending the existence of my grandma, Her Majesty The Queen – and in grieving her misfortune – we are undeniably helped to remember the directing compass she was to so many in her obligation to administration and obligation.

‘She was universally appreciated and regarded. Her unfaltering beauty and poise stayed valid all through her life and presently her never-ending inheritance.

‘Allow us to repeat the words she expressed after the death of her significant other, Prince Philip, words which can carry solace to us all at this point: ‘Life, obviously, comprises of definite partings as well as first gatherings.”

He added: ‘Granny, while this last splitting brings us extraordinary trouble, I am everlastingly thankful for every one of our most memorable gatherings from my earliest cherished recollections with you, to meeting you interestingly as my Commander-in-Chief, to the primary second you met my dear spouse and embraced your darling incredible grandkids.

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex walk to meet members of the public at Windsor Castle on Saturday after the Queen's death

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex walk to meet members of the public at Windsor Castle on Saturday after the Queen’s death
The Prince and Princess of Wales and the Duke and Duchess of Sussex on the Long Walk at Windsor Castle on Saturday

The Prince and Princess of Wales and the Duke and Duchess of Sussex on the Long Walk at Windsor Castle on Saturday
The Duke of Sussex has paid an emotional tribute to his late grandmother the Queen as he thanked her for her "sound advice"

The Duke of Sussex has paid an emotional tribute to his late grandmother the Queen as he thanked her for her ‘sound advice’

‘I cherish these times shared with you, and the many other special moments in between. You are already sorely missed, not just by us, but by the world over.

Duke of Sussex’s tribute to the Queen in full

Here is the statement released by the Duke of Sussex in full.

‘In celebrating the life of my grandmother, Her Majesty The Queen – and in mourning her loss – we are all reminded of the guiding compass she was to so many in her commitment to service and duty.

‘She was globally admired and respected. Her unwavering grace and dignity remained true throughout her life and now her everlasting legacy.

‘Let us echo the words she spoke after the passing of her husband, Prince Philip, words which can bring comfort to all of us now: ‘Life, of course, consists of final partings as well as first meetings.’

‘Granny, while this final parting brings us great sadness, I am forever grateful for all of our first meetings – from my earliest childhood memories with you, to meeting you for the first time as my Commander-in-Chief, to the first moment you met my darling wife and hugged your beloved great-grandchildren.

‘I cherish these times shared with you, and the many other special moments in between. You are already sorely missed, not just by us, but by the world over. And as it comes to first meetings, we now honour my father in his new role as King Charles III.

‘Thank you for your commitment to service. Thank you for your sound advice. Thank you for your infectious smile.

‘We, too, smile knowing that you and grandpa are reunited now, and both together in peace.’

‘Thank you for your infectious smile. We, too, smile knowing that you and grandpa are reunited now, and both together in peace.’

Harry’s statement comes two days after the Prince and Princess of Wales put on a united front with the Duke and Duchess of Sussex as they joined forces on a walkabout at Windsor Castle over the weekend.

William and Harry have a well-documented troubled relationship but the death of their grandmother saw the rivals shelve their differences when, with their wives, they viewed floral tributes left to the late Queen.

It is understood the prince invited his brother to join them in meeting well-wishers outside the castle, and a royal source said William thought it was an ‘important show of unity’.

Two years have passed since William, Kate, Harry and Meghan were together side-by-side in public, during the 2020 Commonwealth Day church service on March 9, 2020.

As the couple’s first engagement under their new titles, William and Kate were joined by Harry and Meghan as they inspected flowers and balloons before a walkabout at the castle on Saturday.

A royal source said the Prince of Wales asked his brother and his wife to join them in viewing the tributes.

The source said: ‘The Prince of Wales invited the Duke and Duchess to join him and the Princes of Wales earlier.’

The last time William was joined in public by his brother at Windsor Castle was at the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh in April last year.

Both couples left in the same vehicle as the engagement, which lasted more than 40 minutes, came to a close. All four were dressed in black as they walked along the gates of the castle.

The crowd was heard chatting excitedly and taking photographs as William and Kate and the Duke and Duchess of Sussex stopped to speak to each person at the front of the barriers.

The royal couples walked along separately from one another, with William and Kate speaking to people on one side of the road and Harry and Meghan speaking to people on the other side of the road.

Today, large crowds are expected in Scotland today as King Charles III prepares to lead the royal family in a procession behind the coffin of his mother when it travels to an Edinburgh cathedral to allow the public to pay their respects.

Soldiers in the Life Guards at Wellington Barracks in London practise for Queen Elizabeth II's funeral procession this morning

Soldiers in the Life Guards at Wellington Barracks in London practise for Queen Elizabeth II’s funeral procession this morning
Soldiers in the Life Guards at Wellington Barracks in London practise for Queen Elizabeth II's funeral procession this morning

Soldiers in the Life Guards at Wellington Barracks in London practise for Queen Elizabeth II’s funeral procession this morning
Soldiers in the Life Guards at Wellington Barracks in London practise for Queen Elizabeth II's funeral procession this morning

Soldiers in the Life Guards at Wellington Barracks in London practise for Queen Elizabeth II’s funeral procession this morning
Soldiers in the Life Guards at Wellington Barracks in London practise for Queen Elizabeth II's funeral procession this morning

Soldiers in the Life Guards at Wellington Barracks in London practise for Queen Elizabeth II’s funeral procession this morning
Soldiers in the Life Guards at Wellington Barracks in London practise for Queen Elizabeth II's funeral procession this morning

Soldiers in the Life Guards at Wellington Barracks in London practise for Queen Elizabeth II’s funeral procession this morning

The Queen will be taken from the Palace of Holyroodhouse to nearby St Giles’ Cathedral where her family, and a congregation drawn from all areas of Scottish society, will attend a service of thanksgiving for her life.

What will happen today after the Queen’s death?

Here is the timeline of events that are expected to take place today following the Queen’s death.

Monday marks D-Day +3, or D+3, in the plans for the aftermath of the death, codenamed London Bridge.

This is due to the announcement taking place late on Thursday, meaning plans were shifted a day to allow the complex arrangements to be put in place.

– The King and The Queen Consort will travel to Westminster Hall where both Houses of Parliament will meet to express their condolences at the demise of The Queen. Charles will make his reply.

– 12.45pm: The King and The Queen Consort will arrive at Edinburgh Airport.

Charles and Camilla will then travel to the Palace of Holyroodhouse, where the Ceremony of the Keys will take place. The King will inspect the Guard of Honour before being welcomed to his ‘ancient and hereditary kingdom of Scotland’ by the Lord Provost, and symbolically receiving the keys of the city of Edinburgh.

– 2.35pm: Following the Ceremony of the Keys, the King will join the procession of the Queen’s coffin to St Giles’ Cathedral.

– 3pm: The King and the Queen Consort, accompanied by other royal family members, will attend a service of prayer and reflection for the life of the Queen at St Giles’ Cathedral.

– The King will then receive the First Minister of Scotland, followed by the presiding officer, at the Palace of Holyroodhouse.

– 5.40pm: Charles and Camilla will receive a motion of condolence, tabled by the First Minister at the Scottish Parliament, and attend a reception.

The Royal Company of Archers, who are the King’s bodyguard for Scotland, will give a royal salute.

– The King, accompanied by members of the royal family, will then hold a vigil at St Giles’ Cathedral.

Full details about the royal mourners have yet to be released but there is speculation the Duke and Duchess of Sussex and the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and Cambridge, who on Saturday put on a united front during an appearance at Windsor Castle, will be part of the group.

Charles will lead some of the royals – expected to be the Duke of York, Earl of Wessex and the Princess Royal and her husband Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence – on foot, while the Queen Consort and other members of the monarchy follow in cars.

Members of the public will be able to view the coffin to pay their respects for 24 hours before it is taken to London to lie in state.

Later in the evening, the King and other members of his family, likely his siblings, will hold a vigil at the cathedral in honour of the Queen.

Charles and Camilla are in London and, before leaving for the Scottish capital, will visit Westminster Hall, where both Houses of Parliament will express their condolences to the new monarch and his wife, with the King giving his reply.

During his day in Edinburgh, the King will inspect a guard of honour at the Palace of Holyroodhouse before attending a ceremony of the keys on the forecourt.

At the Palace, the King will hold audiences with First Minister Nicola Sturgeon and, separately, Alison Johnstone, Scottish Parliament’s presiding officer.

Words of sympathy will be expressed by the Scottish Parliament when Charles and Camilla attend to receive a motion of condolence, with the King replying.

Ms Johnstone told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme that parliament will ‘come together to express through a motion of condolence our deepest condolences to His Majesty the King and to the royal family’.

She added: ‘The tone will be respectful. This afternoon gives us an opportunity to reflect on the life of Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth, to pay gratitude for that life and to ensure that the royal family have the support… the heartfelt sympathies of the Scottish people.’

Edinburgh City Council leader Cammy Day said on Monday the city is expecting large crowds.

‘We’re expecting tens of thousands of people to be up and down the high street as Her Majesty comes up to St Giles’ and then onwards from there tomorrow,’ he told BBC Radio Scotland.

‘Our advice to people is to get to the city centre as quickly and early as you can (and) use public transport because the city has diversions or road closures.

‘We are looking forward to welcoming tens of thousands of people to give Her Majesty the send off that the city will give her.’

Scottish Tory leader Douglas Ross said: ‘The Queen loved Scotland and Scotland loved the Queen and I think we showed that yesterday.

Crowds watch as the hearse carrying the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II passes down the Royal Mile in Edinburgh yesterday

Crowds watch as the hearse carrying the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II passes down the Royal Mile in Edinburgh yesterday
Vice Admiral Timothy Laurence, Princess Anne, Prince Andrew and Sophie, Countess of Wessex watch as the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II completes its journey from Balmoral to the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh yesterday

Vice Admiral Timothy Laurence, Princess Anne, Prince Andrew and Sophie, Countess of Wessex watch as the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II completes its journey from Balmoral to the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh yesterday
An Accession Proclamation Ceremony in Edinburgh yesterday, publicly proclaiming King Charles III as the new monarch

An Accession Proclamation Ceremony in Edinburgh yesterday, publicly proclaiming King Charles III as the new monarch

‘I think we’ll see that again today with the service of thanksgiving, and I think it is a fitting tribute to the late Queen that Scotland is able to play this role at this early part in the national mourning,’ he told BBC Radio 4.

Liberal Democrat leader Sir Ed Davey said the King’s appearance in Parliament will be a moment of ‘reflection’ and ‘great sadness’.

‘It’s a part of Westminster which is resplendent with history,’ he told Sky News. ‘I think we’ll all be very proud – proud of our country, proud of our amazing monarchy.’

Meanwhile, former head of the British Army, Lord Dannatt, said the armed forces have a ‘special bond’ with their monarch.

‘Much has been made of the fact that when we join the Army, Navy, Air Force, whatever, we sign, we swear an oath of allegiance.

‘Seamlessly, when the Queen breathed her last last Thursday, our allegiance as soldiers of the Queen, we immediately became soldiers of the King. And that’s a very special link that the military have.

‘We carry out operations at risk of life and limb, not in the name of the Government or the Prime Minister or the Secretary of State for Defence, we do it in the name of the sovereign and the people of this country.

‘That’s a very special link, a very special bond. Actually, I think it makes the British armed forces themselves pretty special as a result.’

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