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Eunice result rocks Britain: 250,000 homes in South are STILL without power, train networks are deadened and presently England will be hit by SNOW – with bill for harm set to hit £500m after record 122mph breezes

Eunice result rocks Britain: 250,000 homes in South are STILL without power, train networks are deadened and presently England will be hit by SNOW – with bill for harm set to hit £500m after record 122mph breezes

Broad travel bedlam brought about by Storm Eunice is set to go on through today as the £500million tidy up starts and around 250,000 individuals across Britain stay without power. Something like three individuals have been killed in the UK as record-breaking hurricanes of 122mph tore through the country yesterday in one of the most terrible tempests to have hit the island in many years. Many train administrations will stay unopened toward the beginning of today and ‘don’t travel’ sees have been reissued for various administrations, as indicated by National Rail Enquiries. Around a fourth of 1,000,000 individuals are still without power, with a tidy up set to start after the tempest carried harm and destruction to the UK and Ireland in sensational scenes. Starting final evening, the quantity of families without power recorded by suppliers was: 6,000 in Northern Power, 112,000 in Western Power, 260 in Electricity North West, 156,000 in UK Power Networks and 120,000 in the Scottish and Southern organizations. The Met Office has given a less-serious yellow breeze cautioning for a significant part of the south bank of England and South Wales on Saturday, which it said

‘could hamper recuperation endeavors from Storm Eunice’.

Travel disarray brought about by Storm Eunice will go on through today as the £500million tidy up starts
Many train administrations will stay unopened and ‘don’t travel’ sees have been reissued for administrations
Countless individuals across Britain stay without power after destruction of Eunice
A tidy up is set to start after the tempest brought harm and record-breaking whirlwinds to the UK
The tempest lead to the passings of somewhere around four individuals and removed the top of The O2 vault in London
Inescapable travel mayhem brought about by Storm Eunice is set to go on through today as the £500million tidy up starts, around 250,000 individuals across Britain stay without power, and portions of northern England will be hit by snow this end of the week.

Something like three individuals have been killed in the UK as record-breaking hurricanes of 122mph cried through the country yesterday in one of the most terrible tempests to have crushed the island in many years.

In sensational scenes, the top of The O2 in London was destroyed, while trees were torn up, flotsam and jetsam was sent flying, and customers were blown over.

In excess of 430 flights were dropped or redirected and London City Airport was shut for the majority of the day. An expected 5 million were held by live-stream video of airplane endeavoring to land at London’s Heathrow Airport during the tempest.

Around a fourth of 1,000,000 individuals are still without power. Starting final evening, the quantity of families without power recorded by suppliers was: 6,000 in Northern Power, 112,000 in Western Power, 260 in Electricity North West, 156,000 in UK Power Networks and 120,000 in the Scottish and Southern organizations.

The Met Office has now given a yellow admonition for snow covering portions of northern England and the Midlands, set up from 11am until 3pm. A few streets and rail lines will probably be impacted with longer excursion times, the public climate office added.

In numbers: Storm Eunice, which broke breeze speed records and guaranteed something like four lives
4 passings in the UK and Ireland
122mph record wind speed for England
1.1million properties endure power cuts
435,000 properties actually impacted final evening
20million told to remain at home
10 extreme flood alerts
10,000 dropped rail administrations
1,000 individuals cleared from O2 Arena
36,000 understudies sent home in Swansea
A brief time of weighty snow might cause some transitory interruption on streets, basically across higher ground, for example, the Peak District,’ the Met Office said.

A less-extreme yellow breeze cautioning has additionally been given for a significant part of the south bank of England and South Wales on Saturday.

Many train administrations stay suspended on Saturday morning and ‘don’t travel’ sees are set up for courses including the Southern, Thameslink and Great Northern organizations. Travelers are as yet being approached to abstain from voyaging where conceivable.

South Western Railway expects ‘critical disturbance’ across its organization in the first part of the day, while Great Western Railway administrations are suspended until somewhere around 10am and others suspended until no less than 1pm.

More noteworthy Anglia and Stansted Express have suspended all administrations because of numerous trees on the line with trains holding off on pursuing until 10am.

In the interim, Avanti West Coast anticipates that a few courses should stay shut until early in the day with some rail substitution transport administrations, while LNER has declared ‘conceivable disturbance’ through Saturday morning and Southeastern is dropping administrations over the course of the morning ‘basically’ because of more trees having fallen onto lines for the time being.

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps let telecasters know today that the general population ought to anticipate disturbance for the remainder of the day.

He said:

‘Groups have dealing with the night to attempt to get street and rail resumed. Obviously, anticipate disturbance today – trains are in some unacceptable areas, there’s still garbage being eliminated from our streets, air terminals are relied upon to be extremely occupied with individuals finding flights.

‘So anticipate disturbance, do check before you travel… however, things are getting back to business as usual.’

London Fire Brigade said it accepting 1,958 approaches Friday as Eunice hit the capital – multiple times more than the earlier day. The help tweeted: ‘Albeit the most terrible of #StormEunice is over its influence might reach out into the next few days. If it’s not too much trouble, know about the potential for free designs or falling garbage’.

A representative for the Severn intersections toward the beginning of today affirmed the M4 Prince of Wales Bridge was completely open and expected to remain so. However, the M48 Severn Bridge will stay shut because of the Met Office estimate of additional high breezes.

A lady in her 30s passed on after a tree fell on a vehicle in Haringey, north London on Friday evening, the Metropolitan Police said. A man in his 50s passed on in Netherton, Merseyside after flotsam and jetsam struck the windscreen of a vehicle he was going in.

One more man in his 20s was killed in Alton, Hampshire after a Mercedes-Benz Sprinter get crashed into a tree in Old Odiham Road not long before early afternoon.

Prior, a man in Co Wexford, Ireland, was likewise killed by a falling tree. An individual from people in general endured ‘genuine wounds’ in the wake of being struck by flotsam and jetsam from a rooftop in Henley-on-Thames. Two men were hospitalized after comparative, separate occurrences in south London.

  • Midlands today;
  • Weathermen described Eunice as one of the worst storms to have battered the UK in decades.
A catamaran washed up along the seafront in Brighton, Sussex, after Storm Eunice brought damage, disruption and record-breaking gusts of wind to the UK and Ireland, leading to the deaths of at least four people

A Mercedes-Benz Sprinter flatbed van which was crushed by a 40ft tree in Alton, Hampshire

A Mercedes-Benz Sprinter flatbed van which was crushed by a 40ft tree in Alton, Hampshire

A fallen tree blocks a road on February 19, 2022 in Southwick, England

A fallen tree blocks a road on February 19, 2022 in Southwick, England

An unlucky car is damaged by a fallen tree lying in the path of Storm Eunice on February 19, 2022 in Southwick, England

An unlucky car is damaged by a fallen tree lying in the path of Storm Eunice on February 19, 2022 in Southwick, England

Passengers wait at Waterloo station, London, for cancelled or delayed trains in the aftermath of Storm Eunice

Passengers wait at Waterloo station, London, for cancelled or delayed trains in the aftermath of Storm Eunice

Passengers wait at Waterloo station, London, for cancelled or delayed trains in the aftermath of Storm Eunice

Passengers wait at Waterloo station, London, for cancelled or delayed trains in the aftermath of Storm Eunice

A tree blocks the B3273 road after Storm Eunice, in St Austell, Cornwall, February 19, 2022

A tree blocks the B3273 road after Storm Eunice, in St Austell, Cornwall, February 19, 2022

A street cleaner sweeps up in Leicester Square in the aftermath of Storm Eunice

A street cleaner sweeps up in Leicester Square in the aftermath of Storm Eunice

The white-domed roof of the O2 Arena is seen this morning after it was damaged during Storm Eunice

The white-domed roof of the O2 Arena is seen this morning after it was damaged during Storm Eunice

A snow plough on the Buttertubs Pass near Hawes, North Yorkshire, after Storm Eunice brought damage, disruption and record-breaking gusts of wind to the UK and Ireland

A snow plough on the Buttertubs Pass near Hawes, North Yorkshire, after Storm Eunice brought damage, disruption and record-breaking gusts of wind to the UK and Ireland

A snow plough on the Buttertubs Pass near Hawes, North Yorkshire this mprning

A snow plough on the Buttertubs Pass near Hawes, North Yorkshire this mprning

The Met Office has now issued a yellow warning for snow covering parts of northern England and the Midlands, in place from 11am until 3pm

The Met Office has now issued a yellow warning for snow covering parts of northern England and the Midlands, in place from 11am until 3pm

Around 250,000 people across the UK are still without power, according to power suppliers SSEN, UK Power Networks, Western Power, Northern Power and SP Energy (power outage maps pictured above)

A chimney has collaped at a Power Plant on the Isle of Graint in Kent due to winds from Storm Eunice. There should be three chimneys but one has collapsed

A chimney has collaped at a Power Plant on the Isle of Graint in Kent due to winds from Storm Eunice. (Before photo, the middle chimney has since collapsed)
A chimney has collapsed at a Power Plant on the Isle of Graint in Kent due to winds from Storm Eunice. There should be three chimneys (before photo, right)

A roadside filled with debris from the rooftops of three houses which were torn off during storm Eunice, on Kilburn Park Road in north west London

A roadside filled with debris from the rooftops of three houses which were torn off during storm Eunice, on Kilburn Park Road in north west London

General view of wind damage to a construction site alongside the river Thames, in London after high winds

General view of wind damage to a construction site alongside the river Thames, in London after high winds

The departures board at Waterloo station, London, displaying cancelled and delayed trains in the aftermath of Storm Eunice

The departures board at Waterloo station, London, displaying cancelled and delayed trains in the aftermath of Storm Eunice

A noticeboard warns of disruption to the train network after Storm Eunice, in St Austell, Cornwall

A noticeboard warns of disruption to the train network after Storm Eunice, in St Austell, Cornwall

A person walks past a fallen tree in Cemetery Park after Storm Eunice, in St Austell, Cornwall

A person walks past a fallen tree in Cemetery Park after Storm Eunice, in St Austell, Cornwall

A mobile home is seen completely destroyed after Storm Eunice tore through St Albans in Hertfordshire on Friday

A mobile home is seen completely destroyed after Storm Eunice tore through St Albans in Hertfordshire on Friday

Many train services will remain unopened this morning and ‘do not travel’ notices have been reissued for a number of services, according to National Rail Enquiries

Many train services will remain unopened this morning and ‘do not travel’ notices have been reissued for a number of services, according to National Rail Enquiries

Large trees have fallen on the long walk in Windsor Great Park after Storm Eunice hits the UK

Large trees have fallen on the long walk in Windsor Great Park after Storm Eunice hits the UK
Scene on Muswell Hill Road in north London. A woman has died in Muswell Hill, north London, after a tree fell onto a car she was travelling in

The Met Office has issued a less-severe yellow wind warning for today (pictured) and tomorrow

The Met Office has issued a less-severe yellow wind warning for today and tomorrow (pictured)
 The Met Office has issued a less-severe yellow wind warning for today (left) and tomorrow (right)

The Environment Agency has kept flood warnings across much of England in place this morning

The Environment Agency has kept flood warnings across much of England in place this morning

Here are some of the strongest wind speeds on record in the UK, according to Met Office data:

  • 98mph: The strongest gust recorded during Storm Arwen on the night of November 26-27 2021, at Brizlee Wood, Northumberland. Before Storm Eunice, Arwen was the most recent example of a red weather warning being issued in the UK.
  • 105mph: The strongest gust during Storm Gertrude on January 29 2016, at Lerwick in the Shetland Islands. This storm saw a red weather warning issued for the whole of the Shetlands.
  • 115mph: The peak wind speed reached during the ‘Great Storm’ of the night of October 15-16 1987, at Shoreham-by-Sea in West Sussex. Gusts also reached 99mph at Gatwick Airport and 94mph in central London.
  • 118mph: The strongest gust recorded at a low-level location in England, at Gwennap Head in Cornwall on December 15 1979.
  • 142mph: The strongest gust recorded at any low-level location in the UK, at Fraserburgh in Aberdeenshire, on February 13 1989.
  • 173mph: This was the strongest gust ever recorded in the UK, at Cairngorm summit in the Highlands of Scotland on March 20 1986.

Another man in his 20s was killed in Alton, Hampshire after a Mercedes-Benz Sprinter pick-up collided with a tree in Old Odiham Road just before midday.

Earlier, a man in Co Wexford, Ireland, was also killed by a falling tree. A member of the public suffered ‘serious injuries’ after being struck by debris from a roof in Henley-on-Thames. Two men were hospitalised following similar, separate incidents in south London.

As of early Saturday morning the National Rail website still listed no services for: Avanti West Coast, Chiltern Railways, Grand Central, Great Western Railway, Greater Anglia, Heathrow Express, South Western Railway, Stansted Express and Transport for Wales.

Meanwhile, CrossCountry Trains has asked passengers not to travel on Saturday

‘following cancelled strike action’.

The provider wrote on Twitter:

‘Whilst a strike has been called off, we have not been able to reinstate our timetable. An amended timetable runs today.’

Cancellations are in place between the following stations: Aberdeen and Edinburgh; Glasgow Central and Edinburgh; Derby and Nottingham; Peterborough and Stansted; Cheltenham Spa and Cardiff Central; Newton Abbot and Paignton; Exeter St David’s and Penzance; Reading and Bournemouth.

Millions of people were urged to stay at home on Friday due to safety fears over the impact of Eunice, while transport woes meant many were unable to travel.

Do not travel alerts were issued across railways in England and Wales on Friday, as seven operators suspended all services, with footage showing a building roof being blown on to tracks.

The train operators which stopped running all services on Friday afternoon were: c2c, Chiltern Railways, Great Western Railway, Greater Anglia, South Western Railway, Southeastern and Transport for Wales.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and Ofgem published interim reports into the fallout from Arwen this week. It criticised the response from energy companies and accused them of providing ‘overly optimistic’ estimates for when supplies could be restored.

Ministers yesterday scrambled to reassure the public that lessons had been learnt. Damian Hinds told Sky News:

‘Over the longer term, a lot of learning has been done from Storm Arwen, particularly on welfare issues, staying in touch with people, staying in touch with customers for the networks.’

More than 430 flights due to take off or land at UK airports were also cancelled on Friday.

An estimated 5million people watched video of aircraft battling with high winds while they attempted to land at Heathrow. Jerry Dyer, who runs the YouTube channel Big Jet TV, told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: ‘Yesterday, when the whole Storm Eunice, and prior to that Storm Dudley… I said in the morning… I wonder if we can possibly reach 30,000 people watching live, as many as we did during Storm Ciara.

‘Every now and then you’d glance at the number of people watching and you’re like, 88,000 people… 105,000 people – it was just going mad.

‘At the end of the day we ended up with… normally we’d have about 100,000-plus views, and we had, from when I went to sleep last night, it was 5.5million views.’

Mr Dyer said at one point there were 238,000 viewers watching live during the channel’s peak popularity on Friday.

The roof of Hughenden Village Hall in High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire has blown off

A view of part of a flat roof from a nearby block of flats which was blown off and landed on a house in Bitterne, Southampton

A view of part of a flat roof from a nearby block of flats which was blown off and landed on a house in Bitterne, Southampton

Oliver Le Besque said there was a 'river of blood running down the road' after the cab of the flatbed truck was 'completely crushed' by the huge tree in Alton, Hampshire yesterday

Oliver Le Besque said there was a ‘river of blood running down the road’ after the cab of the flatbed truck was ‘completely crushed’ by the huge tree in Alton, Hampshire yesterday
Mr Le Besque was one of several hero rescuers who sprang into action when the ‘enormous’ tree fell on the vehicle in Alton
A roadside filled with debris from the rooftops of three houses which were torn off during storm Eunice, on Kilburn Park Road in north west London

Parts of the roof of The O2 arena were damaged by high winds brought on by Storm Eunice yesterday

Sven Good, 23, with girlfriend Anna Parnanen. was at home at his parents’ house in Brentwood Ess exwhen the Oak Tree smashed through his bedroom window during storm Eunice

Handout photo taken with permission from the Twitter feed of @john_morgan_wal showing a trampoline flying mid air during Storm Eunice in Builth Wells, mid Wales

Handout photo taken with permission from the Twitter feed of @john_morgan_wal showing a trampoline flying mid air during Storm Eunice in Builth Wells, mid Wales
Switch Island closed yesterday after debris hit a van windscreen, leaving a man injured

Switch Island closed yesterday after debris hit a van windscreen, leaving a man injured

A fallen tree rests against a house blocking a road in Sudbury, Suffolk
Taking a tumble: A shopper struggles to negotiate a pedestrian crossing on London’s Euston Road, and is rescued by a passer by

Astonishing footage from Croydon shows pedestrians being knocked to their feet and propelled across the tarmac by the powerful gusts

Astonishing footage from Croydon shows pedestrians being knocked to their feet and propelled across the tarmac by the powerful gusts
Astonishing footage from Croydon shows pedestrians being knocked to their feet and propelled across the tarmac by the powerful gusts

Astonishing footage from Croydon shows pedestrians being knocked to their feet and propelled across the tarmac by the powerful gusts

Debris from the rooftops of three houses torn off during Storm Eunice litter the pavement on Kilburn Park Road, north west London

Debris from the rooftops of three houses torn off during Storm Eunice litter the pavement on Kilburn Park Road, north west London
Strong winds blew a tree into the front of a bus in Biggin Hill in London, adding to the clean-up bill for Storm Eunice. There were no reported injuries from the incident
Handout photo taken with permission from the Twitter feed of @thisissandbanks, of the scene at the Royal Motor Yacht Club in Poole, during Storm Eunice

The O2 could be closed ‘for months’ as music fans face uncertainty over upcoming performances at the venue after Storm Eunice ripped the dome’s roof apart.

The popular arena in London ‘s Greenwich was hard-hit by Friday’s fierce winds, which hit a record 122mph, with large sections of the canvas roof being torn away.

Dramatic photographs and videos appear to show that at least six sections of the roof, which measures 1200ft (365m) in diameter, have been shredded.

Around 1,000 people were evacuated from the venue on Friday as firefighters rushed to the scene to make sure ‘no one was injured by any further falling debris’.

After The O2 closed due to the damage, an employee told The Mirror that they had been warned the venue could be closed ‘for a few months’ while repairs are underway.

Preston train station also closed to passengers, with rail engineers inspecting sections of metal roof paneling that came off due to the winds.

The Port of Dover announced it was closed ‘in the interests of customer and staff safety’, meaning no ferries could operate between Dover and Calais. Several sailings across the Irish Sea were also cancelled.

Traffic Wales, the Welsh Government’s traffic information service for motorways and trunk roads, warned that ‘many HGVs are ignoring the safety advice on Britannia Bridge’.

The bridge, which connects the island of Anglesey with mainland Wales, is closed to all traffic except cars and car-derived vans.

There were one-hour delays on the M25 due to the closure of the Queen Elizabeth II bridge, which is part of the Dartford Crossing.

The RAC said the number of call-outs to broken-down vehicles was lower than normal, indicating that many people were ‘taking the weather warnings seriously and not setting out’.

It added:

‘The fact many roads are so clear is a sign that today is not a safe day to be driving.’

Transport for London urged people to avoid non-essential journeys in the capital.

As of Friday afternoon there were severe delays on to the tube’s District Line, Jubilee Line and Piccadilly line, while TfL Rail was suspended.

The M4 Prince of Wales Bridge reopened on Friday afternoon. It was believed to be the first time both crossings had been closed at the same time due severe winds.

Areas affected by the warning could experience more bridge closures, travel delays and further power cuts.

Icy stretches are also expected widely across Northern England, Northern Ireland and Scotland, with some snow in the regions. Five flood warnings were also still in place.

Winds of 122mph were provisionally recorded at the Needles on the Isle of Wight on Friday, which, if verified, would be the highest ever recorded in England. The previous record was 118mph at Gwennap Head in Cornwall in 1979.

Yesterday, the Environment Agency issued 10 ‘danger to life’ flood warnings for parts of the River Severn and the Wye Estuary. There were also 26 flood warnings and 101 flood alerts in force.

The Scottish Environment Protection Agency issued one flood warning from Ayr to Troon, with five other flood alerts and one flood warning. And the Coastguard service urged people to stay at home.

The O2 could be closed ‘for months’ as music fans face uncertainty over upcoming performances at the venue after Eunice ripped the dome’s roof apart. The popular arena in Greenwich was hard-hit by Friday’s fierce winds, with large sections of the canvas roof being torn away. Upcoming gigs scheduled include rapper Dave on Monday and Tuesday, and UB40 on Friday.

In a post on Twitter, The O2 said it would remain closed this weekend.

‘Due to adverse weather conditions, we can confirm that there has been some damage caused to the tent fabric in our roof at The O2″, the statement said.

‘The affected areas have been cleared and The O2 will remain closed tomorrow morning whilst urgent repairs take place.’

The venue’s website said Friday’s postponed show by Indian singer and rapper AP Dhillon in the Indigo At The O2 performance space had been rescheduled to Tuesday. There have been no updates yet as to whether Dave’s shows in the main arena will go ahead.

Storm Eunice’s 122mph winds blow down an 801ft-high chimney stack at gas-fired power station in Kent that supplies electricity to one million homes 

A chimney stack collapsed at a power station that supplies electricity to one million homes because of extreme winds during Storm Eunice.

The central tower, one of three at Grain Power Station near Rochester, Kent, crumbled yesterday.

The £500million gas-fired power station, which is a little more than a mile from the Kent coast, on the Isle of Grain, was forced to close temporarily.

It has an operational capacity of 1,275 megawatts, which can power up to one million homes in the area.

A chimney has collaped at a Power Plant on the Isle of Graint in Kent due to winds from Storm Eunice. There should be three chimneys but one has collapsed

A chimney collapsed at a power plant on the Isle of Grain in Kent due to winds from Storm Eunice
There are usually three towers (pictured) at the £500million Grain Power Station near Rochester
The collapse came as at least four people were killed by falling trees and debris as Storm Eunice battered the UK with winds of up to 122mph

It came as at least four people were killed by falling trees and debris as Storm Eunice battered the UK with winds of up to 122mph – causing widespread damage and travel chaos for millions across the country.

The top wind speed of 122mph is provisionally highest gust ever in England – even higher than in the 1987 Great Storm.

Uniper UK, which owns the plant, said there were no casualties and no risk to the public.

It said: ‘A weather-related incident has occurred at Grain power station, during storm Eunice.

‘We can confirm that there are no casualties and there is no risk to the local community.’

However, it has caused some damage on site and the power station has been temporarily taken offline as a precaution.’

 

This is the incredible cockpit footage of a Qatar Airways Boeing 777 landing during yesterday’s Storm Eunice at Heathrow Airport yesterday combined with Big Jet TV’s animated commentary.

More than 200,000 people were watching the YouTube channel hosted by Jerry Dywer who was standing on his van at the end of Heathrow Airport’s Runway 27 as aircraft battled the terrible conditions.

Qatar Airways captain Khalifa Al Thani had set up a camera in his cockpit ahead of his arrival in Heathrow which filmed him as he kept his aircraft lined up with the runway.

Ex Formula One World Champion Damon Hill saw footage of Captain Al Thani’s aircraft handling and said:

‘This commands respect.’

Ex Formula One World Champion Damon Hill saw Captain Al Thani’s footage and said: ‘This commands respect’

Captain Khalifa Al Thani, pictured, posted footage from inside the cockpit of his Boeing 777 as he battled with the controls to keep the jet lined up with Heathrow Airport’s Runway 27L
Captain Al Thani combined his footage with Big Jet TV’s dramatic excited commentary
Inside the cockpit, it was like an ordinary day in the office with no major drama, though on the ground Jerry Dyer of Big Jet TV said: ‘Ooh easy… you’ve got to get it down soon, mate… ah ha ha, nicely done’

Dozens of aircraft had to abandon their approaches to Heathrow yesterday because the wind exceeded safe levels – making the Jet TV footage utterly compelling.

The eight-hour marathon broadcast showed one jet floating over the runway, prompting Mr Dyer: ‘Ooh easy… you’ve got to get it down soon, mate…  ah ha ha, nicely done.’

From inside the cockpit, the footage shows Captain Al Thani with one hand on the control yoke. His other hand was firmly on the massive jet’s throttles.

Captain Al Thani was forced to make constant adjustments as he made his approach moving the yoke rapidly to counter the buffeting winds.

As the jet made its approach, Captain Al Thani’s co-pilot monitored the instruments while he kept his eyes out of the cockpit and on the runway.

Captain Al Thani posted his in cockpit video on Instagram. He said:

‘Huge thanks to “Big Jet Tv” for the awesome coverage today and the exterior footage.’

As Mr Dwyer calls on the pilot to ‘jump on the reversers’, you can see Captain Al Thani’s hands move to operate the thrust reversers which force the engine power forward to assist braking.

In total, more than five million people tuned into Big Jet TV’s footage yesterday.

Speaking to BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, Mr Dyer said: ‘Yesterday, when the whole Storm Eunice, and prior to that Storm Dudley… I said in the morning… I wonder if we can possibly reach 30,000 people watching live, as many as we did during Storm Ciara.

Despite being buffeted by strong winds, Captain Al Thani was able to touch down on the runway’s centre line in what has been described as a ‘text book cross wind landing’

More than five million people watched BigJetTV's footage from Heathrow Airport yesterday
More than five million people watched BigJetTV’s footage from Heathrow Airport yesterday

Aviation fan Jerry Dyer, pictured, hoped some 30,000 people would log onto his live feed yesterday. At one stage more than 220,000 people were watching the footage

Aviation fan Jerry Dyer, pictured, hoped some 30,000 people would log onto his live feed yesterday. At one stage more than 220,000 people were watching the footage

‘At the end of the day we ended up with… normally we’d have about 100,000-plus views, and we had, from when I went to sleep last night, it was 5.5 million views.’

Mr Dyer said at one point there were 238,000 viewers watching live during the channel’s peak popularity on Friday.

Today presenter Nick Robinson said:

‘They dream of that at GB News, I’ll tell you that. It was an extraordinary number of people watching.’

Britain’s obsession with Big Jet TV’s coverage yesterday spawned hundreds of memes
For an hour, the nation was obsessed whether a Qatar Airways Airbus A380 was going to be able to land on Runway 27L or would have to divert
Who is Jerry Dyer, the inspiration behind new internet sensation Big Jet TV?

The maverick planespotter whose live feed and hilarious commentary as planes landed at Heathrow in the teeth of Storm Eunice yesterday is a former interior designer who jacked it in to set up a YouTube channel that has riled his rivals, MailOnline can reveal.

Jerry Dyer’s Big Jet TV had more than 200,000 viewers spending more than seven hours watching stomach-churning footage of airliners touching down almost sideways at Britain’s busiest airport in 120mph gusts.

Mr Dyer, the son of an airline captain from Sussex, has loved all things aviation since he was a child but became an interior designer before pursuing his passion in 2016.

Big Jet TV host Jerry Dyer (pictured) has become an internet sensation. He told viewers to ‘Batten down the hatches, take the day off , grab the popcorn and tune-in for all the action’
Jerry Dyer has a specially modified van which allows him to stand on the roof to provide a superior view of the runway

Subscribers from all over the globe pay around £4-a-month for two live shows a week, commentaries from airports all over the UK and Europe, with access to exclusive footage and invites to fan-only events.

Jerry even has his own modified Big Jet TV van with a scaffold on top so he can film planes on approach from a high vantage point.

And it is this battle for a better view that led to him falling out with rivals after he was accused of trimming a bush outside the Heathrow Hyatt hotel to get a better spot than the rivals.

One critic has even set up a Twitter site called ‘The Lies of Big Jet TV’, where the unnamed troll insists his excitable commentary of landings in storms suggest he

‘almost wants a crash to happen’, adding:

‘This is not an aviation streamer, he is an ambulance chaser’.

When asked about his critics , Jerry replied:

‘There’s a group of them who have been doing it for 4 years! I think they secretly love us’.

And yesterday’s live broadcast has won him tens of thousands of new fans. Big Jet TV viewers were enthralled as Mr Dyer yelled over the wind ‘that is insane’, ‘go on my son’, ‘you beauty’, ‘bosh, get it down mate’ and ‘wallop’ as the jets touched down.

On one occasion he sparked a flurry of tweets as he screamed:

‘Here come the Russians’ as an Aeroflot plane approached, a phrase which then began trending on Twitter.

Later he screamed:

‘The big daddy from Qatar is coming in’, sang Patsy Kline’s ‘Crazy’ when the winds peaked and promised viewers he would stay next to the runway filming until ‘Eunice stops’.

He is supported by his friend and assistant Gilly, who is watching off site and tells Jerry which planes are coming in and deals with emails and tweets from fans.

Storm Eunice has caused power prices to plunge after record-breaking gusts created some of the highest-ever output from wind turbines on Friday.

Day-ahead UK power dropped by 11 per cent to £140 per megawatt-hour (MWh) following the surge in wholesale gas prices in recent months, according to the Telegraph.

The newspaper also reported that wind power has significantly outpaced gas over the past week with turbine energy generation averaging 11.48 gigawatts, well above the 7.2GW for gas.

The Telegraph added that prices in Germany dropped by more than two-thirds to their lowest level this year, and that output from wind farms in the country is expected to double by tomorrow.

Wind power has significantly outpaced gas over the past week with turbine energy generation averaging 11.48 gigawatts, well above the 7.2GW for gas
Day-ahead UK power dropped by 11 per cent to £140 per megawatt-hour (MWh) following the surge in wholesale gas prices in recent months, according to the Daily Telegraph. (Stock image)

Millions of Britons were urged to stay at home, and the storm claimed its first victim when a man in his early 60s was killed by a falling tree in County Wexford in the Republic of Ireland while out working to clear trees.

A second person, a motorist, is believed to have been killed when a large tree fell and crushed a vehicle in the market town of Alton, Hampshire, this afternoon.

Two further victims have since been announced, a woman in her 30s in Haringey, north London, and a man in his 50s in Netherton, Merseyside.

Yesterday’s red warnings ended at 12pm in the South West and 3pm in the South East, but forecasters continue to be concerned over ‘flying debris resulting in danger to life’ as well as ‘roofs blown off and power lines brought down’.

Damage to the roof of the O2 Arena - known as the Millennium Dome when it opened in 2000 - in South East London

Damage to the roof of the O2 Arena – known as the Millennium Dome when it opened in 2000 – in South East London

Picture shows the missing brickwork from the rooftops of three houses torn off during Storm Eunice, on Kilburn Park Road in north west London

Picture shows the missing brickwork from the rooftops of three houses torn off during Storm Eunice, on Kilburn Park Road in north west London

The Isle of Man government has been slammed for ‘sexism’ and ‘misogyny’ after telling the public Storm Eunice had ‘changed her mind like most women’.

The Department of Infrastructure put out a post on Thursday night warning local residents about a potential road closure near Peel Beach and claimed the wind had changed direction.

The post met a backlash from locals who branded the joke ‘outdated’ and while school librarian Helen Jessopp said it was ‘offensive’ and claimed the Government ‘needed to be called out’ for it.

Now the government have claimed the message ‘fell below the standards expected’ and admitted it would ‘not happen again’.

The Facebook post said:

‘A road closure is in place for Peel Promenade 10am Friday 18 February 2022. Due to a change in the wind direction this closure will not go ahead unless required.

The Isle of Man government posted about a road closure due to the start of Storm Eunice

The Isle of Man government posted about a road closure due to the start of Storm
School librarian Helen Jessopp hit out at the government, claiming it was
‘beyond a joke’

‘Thank you for your patience and understanding, but like most women Eunice changes her mind what she’s doing.’

In reaction to the post, several bemused social media users commented in disbelief, claiming it portrayed an ‘outdated’ view and was an example of a ‘micro aggression’ against women.

School librarian Helen Jessopp hit out at the government, claiming it was

‘beyond a joke’ and an example of ‘everyday sexism’.

Helen, from Port Erin, Isle of Man, said:

‘I thought it was a bit outdated and close to the wire for a government department to post something that could be considered quite inflammatory in this day and age.

‘This is an example of everyday sexism. It’s the sort of micro aggression that needs to be called out.

‘It’s so normalized and a lot of people don’t realize that it’s offensive and outdated.

Waves crash against the sea wall and Porthcawl Lighthouse in Porthcawl, Bridgend, Wales, as Storm Eunice hits the south coast

‘It comes across as it being just a bit of banter or a joke, but when it’s constant and it comes from a government department, that goes beyond a joke and a bit of banter.

‘It’s the small things that add up.’

Helen then thought she would ‘banter back’ by posting an equally ‘sweeping’ and inflammatory statement mocking the initial post.

On Facebook, Helen wrote:

‘Weird how it’s not named after a man then, seeing as like most men it’s going to get violent and unpredictably damage property and maybe people haha.’

Helen said:

‘I thought I’d banter back and make a comparison with a different sweeping statement. The post very quickly got deleted almost immediately after I posted that. The fact it was taken down so quickly and the writing style of it made me think it might have been someone who isn’t normally in charge of social media. They might have thought it was an off-the-cuff, flippant comment and not really thinking it through. I think it was probably someone who doesn’t have those comments aimed at them and realise it’s not just a stand alone thing, but one of many that people can encounter in a short period of time from different places.’

However, Twitter users were divided over the comments, with some claiming it was

‘very disappointing’, while others suggested it was merely ‘old-fashioned’ humour.

Lise Pilkington said:

‘2022 and casual misogyny is still alive and well on the Isle of Man and from an @IOMGovernment department too.’

Trudie Woods said: ‘Very disappointing to see!’

Women of Mann said:

‘Poorly judged, poorly worded, poorly executed. The joke isn’t even funny, don’t understand why the OP thought it was a good idea.’

Tony said:

‘Or take it in the way intended it is called old fashioned humour not offensive or I maybe a grumpy old man can I say that.’

Adam Drewett said:

‘Are people really offended by this?! What a world we live in.’

A spokesperson for the Isle of Man Department of Infrastructure said:

‘The Department of Infrastructure is aware of a message posted on its Facebook page this morning, and subsequently amended, which fell below the standards expected of our organisation.

‘Measures are being taken to ensure this does not happen again.’

How 1987 Great Storm claimed 18 lives, flattened 15million trees and caused £1.5billion worth of damage – after forecaster Michael Fish infamously told the nation ‘don’t worry, there isn’t a hurricane on the way’

It was the ‘hurricane’ that made one BBC weatherman a household name, claimed 18 lives in Britain and caused damage costing £1.5billlion.

The Great Storm of October 1987 was brushed off by forecaster Michael Fish hours before it arrived, as he told viewers worried that a hurricane was on the way: ‘…don’t worry if you’re watching, there isn’t’.

In the hours that followed, winds peaked at more than 120mph, damaging buildings, destroying entire forests as 15million trees were felled in the south-east of England and ultimately leading to tragedy as lives were lost.

Millions of homes were left without power, some for days, and a Channel ferry was driven ashore in what turned out to be the worst storm for nearly 300 years.

At some treasured visitor hotpots, including Emmetts Garden in Kent and Chartwell, the home of Sir Winston Churchill, thousands of trees were lost. At the former, only five per cent of woodland survived.

Elsewhere, entire forests – such as Sandlings Forest in East Anglia – lost nearly all their trees.

Highlighting the unprecedented nature of the storm, the Met Office said that even the oldest at the time in the worst affected areas ‘couldn’t recall winds so strong, or destruction on so great a scale’.

MailOnline readers today recalled their memories of the storm, with one, then aged 14, describing her fear as ‘all the lights went out and it was pitch black in the house and outside’.

Another said:

‘I was living in a tower block on an estate in Battersea on the 14th floor and it was terrifying watching other blocks swaying and the water in the toilet bowl splashing around.’

The phenomenon that made the weather event so fierce was a small area of highly intense wind known as a ‘sting jet’.

It had been expected to form during today’s Storm Eunice, before the Met Office later that the phenomenon will not develop after all.

The Met Office last night issued a rare ‘red warning’ for 100mph winds over southern England and urged millions of Britons to stay at home.

The Great Storm of October 1987 made one BBC weatherman a household name, claimed 18 lives in Britain and caused damage costing £1.5billlion. Above: A man in south-west London leaves a phone box knocked over by a falling tree after the famous storm
Winds peaked at more than 120mph, damaging buildings and felling 15million trees in the south-east of England. Millions of homes were left without power, some for days, and a Channel ferry was driven ashore in what turned out to be the worst storm for nearly 300 years

The 1987 storm took place over two nights, October 15 and 16. Signs that danger was developing in the Bay of Biscay off the coast of Spain emerged at midday on October 15.

When it started to move towards Britain, the job of explaining what might happen fell to Mr Fish on BBC One.

He told viewers shortly after 1pm: ‘Earlier on today, apparently, a woman rang the BBC and said she heard there was a hurricane on the way; well, if you’re watching, don’t worry, there isn’t.

‘But having said that, actually, the weather will become very windy, but most of the strong winds, incidentally, will be down over Spain and across into France.’

As people went to bed that night, there was no warning of what was about to happen.

Shortly before midnight, weatherman Bill Giles said in the BBC’s final weather forecast for the day:

‘It looks like most of the strong winds will stay away, although it’s still going to be very breezy up through the Channel and on the eastern side of the country.’

In the hours that followed, the storm swept across Britain, causing severe damage everywhere it went.

It was the Channel Islands that first felt the storm’s full force, with trees falling and blocking roads.

The worst of the damage occurred in south-east England, with gusts of 70 knots or more recorded continually for three or four hours straight.

When the storm started to move towards Britain, the job of explaining what might happen fell to Mr Fish on BBC One. He told viewers shortly after 1pm: ‘Earlier on today, apparently, a woman rang the BBC and said she heard there was a hurricane on the way; well, if you’re watching, don’t worry, there isn’t
The worst of the damage occurred in south-east England, with gusts of 70 knots or more recorded continually for three or four hours straight. Above: A car crushed by a falling tree in London during the 1987 storm
The 1987 storm damaged the homes of thousands of Britons. Above: A homeowner observes the damage to his property

As for the millions of fallen trees, they forced the National Trust to embark on the biggest outdoor repair job in its history as it planted 500,000 replacement plants across the country. At Emmetts Garden (pictured) in Kent, only five per cent of the woodland escaped the battering

As for the millions of fallen trees, they forced the National Trust to embark on the biggest outdoor repair job in its history as it planted 500,000 replacement plants across the country. At Emmetts Garden (pictured) in Kent, only five per cent of the woodland escaped the battering

The hill behind Winston Churchill's family home of Chartwell lost most of its trees – but has since been restored

The hill behind Winston Churchill’s family home of Chartwell lost most of its trees – but has since been restored

The Great Storm in October 1987 is the most famous example of a sting jet forming, the forecaster said.

In that instance wind speeds reached 120 mph and an estimated 15 million trees were brought down by gusts, the Met Office said.

The jets get their name from their resemblance to the sting in a scorpion’s tail, with the Met Office describing how they can be spotted as they develop on satellite images, where the end of the so-called cold conveyor is marked by a hook-shaped cloud with a point at the end.

Explaining how these jets form, the forecaster said weather fronts separate areas of warm and cold air and their interaction creates and develops wet and windy weather.

There are more focused streams of warm and cold air close to the weather fronts, known as conveyor belts – with the warm conveyor rising and the cold conveyor falling.

The Met Office said these ‘wrap around the area of low pressure and help develop it by feeding warm air and moisture into the system’.

It added: ‘The cold conveyor brings its cold air from higher in the atmosphere and from being in a cold air mass. Sometimes it has help from rain and snow as they fall into it and evaporate.

‘This change from liquid to gas requires heat, which is removed from the conveyor, cooling it further. Now we have even colder air falling along the conveyor, speeding up as it does so, like a roller-coaster taking the first drop.

‘As this wind reaches the surface it can often produce much stronger gusts than would otherwise be made by the storm. However, the cold conveyor catches up with itself after a few hours and consumes the sting jet, keeping the length of time and area of potential damage quite small.’

The Met Office also recalled how a number of small boats were wrecked or blown away, with one ship at Dover being blown over and a Channel ferry being blown ashore near Folkestone.

In the aftermath of the storm, questions were raised over how the forecasters got it so wrong.

The Daily Mail’s front page reflected the nation’s anger as it asked: ‘Why weren’t we warned?’

However, Mr Fish was unrepentant immediately afterwards, as he referred to the woman who initially phoned in to express fears that a hurricane was on the way.

He said:

‘The lady was form Wales, which didn’t get the winds, and it was a deep depression, not a hurricane, so I was right’.

The Met Office’s marketing director said afterwards:

‘I don’t think you can call it a mistake – we did forecast stormy weather, we just didn’t get the detail right’.

The AA said that, had they had accurate forecasts, they would have warned motorists to get off the roads.

Instead, thousands of cars were crushed by trees, some with people inside.

The Daily Mail’s original report said:

‘The storm had struck with awesome indifference to human frailty or strength, affluence or poverty.

‘Old age pensioners in seaside nursing homes were bundled out of their ripped-apart wards, weeping in the wind.

‘Drivers of high-priced cars found them crushed and broken, side by side with old bangers equally destroyed.

‘Death struck impartially, it claimed one victim here in a soft hotel bed, another there, sleeping rough on a vagrant’s pavement.

‘It took young and old. People died in their homes, in their cars or doing their jobs in the battle, against the storm’s ravages.’

Kent was one of the worst hit areas, with winds of up to 120mph lashing the county.

In Chatham, a woman was crushed to death in her bed by a falling beech tree, while another victim in the village of Biddenden was killed when two chimney stacks collapsed on his roof and crushed him.

At Howletts Zoo in Canterbury, two leopards escaped when a tree fell on their compound, while looters in Brighton stole electrical goods from the city’s main shopping area after outlets had their windows shattered.

The storm also forced thousands of shops, factories and offices to close, costing the British economy millions of pounds in lost profits.

As for the millions of fallen trees, they forced the National Trust to embark on the biggest outdoor repair job in its history as it planted 500,000 replacement plants across the country.

At Emmetts Garden in Kent, only five per cent of the woodland escaped the battering.

In the aftermath of the storm, questions were raised over how the forecasters got it so wrong. The Daily Mail’s front page reflected the nation’s anger as it asked: ‘Why weren’t we warned?’
The Daily Mail’s original report said: ‘The storm had struck with awesome indifference to human frailty or strength, affluence or poverty. ‘Old age pensioners in seaside nursing homes were bundled out of their ripped-apart wards, weeping in the wind

The newspaper also recorded the immense economic cost of the storm, which hit thousands of businesses and the financial system itself

The newspaper also recorded the immense economic cost of the storm, which hit thousands of businesses and the financial system itself

‘It was like a battle zone,’ gardener Alan Comb recalled in 2014. ‘There were isolated trees sticking up like totem poles.’

At Knole, near Sevenoaks, Kent, sweet chestnuts and other trees fell like dominoes or were stripped of their leaves and branches.

The hill behind Winston Churchill’s family home of Chartwell lost most of its trees – but has since been restored.

And the disruption stretched as far as the City of London’s financial system, with cheques failing to clear – meaning that some Britons were left with their money in limbo.

The failure to accurately forecast the storm led to an internal inquiry in the Met Office, with refinements made to computer models and the training of weathermen.

The storm caused so much damage partly because of the sting jet which formed during it. At the time, forecasters were not aware that the jets existed.

They get their name from their resemblance to the sting in a scorpion’s tail, with the Met Office describing how they can be spotted as they develop on satellite images, where the end of the so-called cold conveyor is marked by a hook-shaped cloud with a point at the end.

A light aircraft is seen lying upside down at Stapleford Abbotts airfield near Epping in Essex after the Great Storm in 1987

A light aircraft is seen lying upside down at Stapleford Abbotts airfield near Epping in Essex after the Great Storm in 1987

A Volkswagen Beetle is trapped under a fallen in the aftermath of the storm. Thousands of homes were left without power for more than 24 hours, and transport disruption was caused due to trees falling onto roads and railway lines

A Volkswagen Beetle is trapped under a fallen in the aftermath of the storm. Thousands of homes were left without power for more than 24 hours, and transport disruption was caused due to trees falling onto roads and railway lines
This shaken Briton is seen looking at what may have been his car, which had been crushed by a falling tree in the 1987 storm
The Daily Mail’s original report said: ‘The storm had struck with awesome indifference to human frailty or strength, affluence or poverty’. Above: A car surrounded by fallen scaffolding after the 1987 storm
Damage in London after the Great Storm, which was made so severe by the ‘sting jet’ phenomenon that is set to strike again today
A red Routemaster bus is seen driving past a broken tree in London in the aftermath of the October 1987 storm

This home was one of the many which was severely damaged by falling trees in the 1987 storm. The failure to accurately forecast the storm led to an internal inquiry in the Met Office, with refinements made to computer models and the training of weathermen

This home was one of the many which was severely damaged by falling trees in the 1987 storm. The failure to accurately forecast the storm led to an internal inquiry in the Met Office, with refinements made to computer models and the training of weathermen

The forecaster defines a sting jet as a small area of very intense winds, which can be as strong as 100mph or more, that can form in powerful weather systems crossing the UK.

While the strongest winds usually take place for a short period of time, perhaps around four hours, and across an area as small as 30 miles, the Met Office said the phenomenon can cause ‘significant damage and risk to life’.

Explaining how these jets form, the forecaster said weather fronts separate areas of warm and cold air and their interaction creates and develops wet and windy weather.

There are more focused streams of warm and cold air close to the weather fronts, known as conveyor belts – with the warm conveyor rising and the cold conveyor falling.

The Met Office said these

‘wrap around the area of low pressure and help develop it by feeding warm air and moisture into the system’.

It added:

‘The cold conveyor brings its cold air from higher in the atmosphere and from being in a cold air mass. Sometimes it has help from rain and snow as they fall into it and evaporate.

‘This change from liquid to gas requires heat, which is removed from the conveyor, cooling it further. Now we have even colder air falling along the conveyor, speeding up as it does so, like a roller-coaster taking the first drop.

‘As this wind reaches the surface it can often produce much stronger gusts than would otherwise be made by the storm.

‘However, the cold conveyor catches up with itself after a few hours and consumes the sting jet, keeping the length of time and area of potential damage quite small.’

 

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