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England could hit 43C tomorrow and is on target for most sizzling day in history today: Heatwave grinds trains to an end, Met Office cautions that ‘thousands will pass on’, schools close and wellbeing authorities caution even solid individuals might be struck down

The Met Office has warned that temperatures could rise even further to 43C (109F) tomorrow - with trains already cancelled, GP surgeries and schools closed amid a serious warning that fit and healthy people could die. Its chief executive Penny Endersby confirmed 'we may well see the hottest day in the UK in history' today - beating the record of 38.7C (101.7F) set in Cambridge in July 2019 - but tomorrow is now expected to be even hotter. With the UK set to be hotter than the Sahara Desert today, transport links in London were already grinding to a halt due to train cancellations - while roads could melt and bosses have urged employees to work from home. Health chiefs told patients to stay away unless it is an emergency amid fears hospitals will be overwhelmed, while emergency services urged swimmers to stay away from lakes and rivers in case they face difficulties. Schools in the likes of Nottinghamshire, Hampshire and Oxfordshire have shut while others will close early - and water providers have also warned of shortages after the hottest day of 2022 so far yesterday with 33C (91F) highs. Pictured: Commuters feel the heat on London Bridge (top left) and on the Underground's Jubilee line (bottom left and centre) this morning

The Met Office has warned that temperatures could rise even further to 43C (109F) tomorrow – with trains already cancelled, GP surgeries and schools closed amid a serious warning that fit and healthy people could die. Its chief executive Penny Endersby confirmed ‘we may well see the hottest day in the UK in history’ today – beating the record of 38.7C (101.7F) set in Cambridge in July 2019 – but tomorrow is now expected to be even hotter. With the UK set to be hotter than the Sahara Desert today, transport links in London were already grinding to a halt due to train cancellations – while roads could melt and bosses have urged employees to work from home. Health chiefs told patients to stay away unless it is an emergency amid fears hospitals will be overwhelmed, while emergency services urged swimmers to stay away from lakes and rivers in case they face difficulties. Schools in the likes of Nottinghamshire, Hampshire and Oxfordshire have shut while others will close early – and water providers have also warned of shortages after the hottest day of 2022 so far yesterday with 33C (91F) highs. Pictured: Commuters feel the heat on London Bridge (top left) and on the Underground’s Jubilee line (bottom left and centre) this morning

Met Office say temperatures could rise to or above 40C (104F) today, crushing the UK’s unequaled record
Individuals are being cautioned to remain at home as meteorologists say the outrageous intensity ‘represents a threat to life’
Rail disarray in London as some Overground and Underground lines are suspended and others face delays
London will be hotter today than the Bahamas, Jamaica, Malaga, Athens and Dakhla in Western Sahara
UK heatwave live: Follow the most recent climate news and travel refreshes here
The Met Office has cautioned that temperatures could climb much further to 43C (109F) tomorrow – with trains currently dropped, medical clinic arrangements dropped and schools shut in the midst of alerts that sound individuals could kick the bucket.

Its CEO Penny Endersby affirmed ‘we might well see the most sultry day in the UK ever’ today – beating the record of 38.7C (101.7F) set in Cambridge in July 2019 – yet tomorrow is currently expected to be considerably more smoking.
With the UK set to be more sizzling than the Sahara Desert today, transport joins in London were at that point coming to a standstill because of train scratch-offs – while streets could dissolve and managers have encouraged representatives to telecommute.

Wellbeing bosses advised patients to remain away except if it is a crisis in the midst of fears clinics will be overpowered, while crisis administrations encouraged swimmers to avoid lakes and streams on the off chance that they face hardships.

A few schools in Nottinghamshire, Hampshire and Oxfordshire have closed while others will close early – and water suppliers have likewise cautioned of deficiencies after the most sizzling day of 2022 up to this point yesterday with 33C (91F) highs.

Different schools were dropping confinements and sports days due to the heatwave. Northwood Community Primary School in Kirkby, Merseyside, said that sports day had been cut out today; while King Charles I School, an optional school in Worcestershire, has dropped all on location confinements both today and tomorrow.

Teacher Endersby told BBC Radio 4’s Today program toward the beginning of today: ‘We figure today we might well see the most sizzling day in the UK ever, with the most sweltering temperatures in the South East, yet really the most elevated temperatures we anticipate tomorrow, and those temperatures will be further north as that warm air pushes north.

‘Tomorrow we’re truly seeing the higher opportunity of 40C and temperatures over that. Indeed, even potentially over that… 41C isn’t off the cards. We’ve even got some 43Cs in the model however we’re trusting it will not be really that high.’

One GP medical procedure in Hertfordshire needed to close a site today since it has no cooling; others in London have messaged patients to caution them of decreased administrations with restricted facility rooms in activity; and Milton Keynes University Hospital said it was ‘remaining down routine short term arrangements and medical procedure’ today and tomorrow.

In Cardiff, a youngsters’ medical clinic’s disease ward at Noah’s Ark Children’s Hospital was left without cooling after the unit bombed in warm climate. Engineers were attempting to fix the shortcoming influencing the chemotherapy region – and that’s what well-being bosses said on the off chance that the issue can’t be tackled, patients will be moved to an alternate ward to keep cool.

As well-being authorities proclaimed a ‘public crisis’, rail confusion was at that point influencing portions of London today – with the Overground suspended between Willesden Junction and Richmond, and Romford and Upminster.

On the Underground, the District, Central, Bakerloo and Jubilee lines all had serious deferrals while the Hammersmith and City Line was totally hacked out because of ‘heat related limitations’ and there was no Metropolitan line between Baker Street and Aldgate. Transport for London advised all travelers in the cash-flow to keep away from unimportant travel.

The burning intensity implies the UK will be hotter than Nassau in the Bahamas (32C), Kingston in Jamaica (33C), Malaga in Spain (28C), Athens in Greece (35C), Albufeira in Portugal (28C) and Dakhla in the Western Sahara (24C).

Temperatures had proactively hit 31C (88F) at Southend-on-Sea in Essex by 10.30am today. As Britons set up camp for the time being at Bournemouth ocean side for the best spot today in the midst of what forecasters called an

‘remarkable hot spell’:

The Met Office encouraged individuals to do ‘as little as conceivable’ to stay away from critical wellbeing gambles as the ‘red advance notice’ started;
Rail travelers were asked to travel provided that ‘essential’ and gritters were conveyed to stop streets dissolving;
Fierce blazes moved throughout dried field following quite a while of dry and broiling conditions in ‘tinderbox’ Britain;
There is currently a 90 percent chance of the untouched UK temperature record being broken today or tomorrow;
Water suppliers including Affinity, Anglian and South East announced supply issues because of the sweltering climate.
Teacher Endersby said today that such outrageous temperatures are not normal past tomorrow, however that the Met Office will then be observing the chance of dry spell before very long.

‘All things considered, we unquestionably don’t see these extremely hot temperatures continuing past Tuesday, so we’re anticipating a major decrease in temperature, leniently, short-term into Wednesday – down 10 or 12 degrees on what it has been the prior days.

Met Office forecast for today

Met Office forecast for tomorrow

People relax on Bournemouth beach in Dorset this morning as the heatwave continues
People relax on Bournemouth beach in Dorset this morning as the heatwave continues

Commuters cross London Bridge today as the Shard reflects the sun in the early morning heat

Commuters cross London Bridge today as the Shard reflects the sun in the early morning heat

People preparing to enter the water in Penzance, Cornwall, today

People preparing to enter the water in Penzance, Cornwall, today

Commuters on London Bridge today

Commuters on London Bridge today
Commuters on London Bridge feel the heat at 8.30am this morning amid the extreme weather conditions

A woman uses a fan to cool herself down as commuters cross London Bridge today in extreme temperatures

A woman uses a fan to cool herself down as commuters cross London Bridge today in extreme temperatures

Latest Met Office forecast predicts highs of 38C across most of England

Train firms urge people not to travel amid heat

More than a dozen train companies are urging Britons not to travel today and tomorrow as the UK’s first red extreme heat warning comes into force.

A total of 21 operators – ranging from Transport for Wales and Gatwick Express to the Transpennine Express and Southern – said they will be running a slower service on Monday and Tuesday after National Rail implemented speed restrictions across its network.

Speed restrictions are used by train companies during periods of hot weather to avoid any damage being made to the tracks and to prevent rails from buckling.

Cancellations are also in place as temperatures are predicted to soar to highs of 38C and 40C in some parts of England. Amber and red extreme heat warnings have been implemented across the nation for the duration.

Those who have to travel are being encouraged to check their journeys on the National Rail website before setting off and taking water with them to stay hydrated.

Refunds are being offered to those who do not travel but have already purchased tickets.

LNER has said no trains are running from south of York and south of Leeds to London Kings Cross on Tuesday.

Rail chaos was already affecting parts of London this morning – with the Overground suspended between Willesden Junction and Richmond, and Romford and Upminster.

On the Underground, the District, Central, Bakerloo and Jubilee lines all had severe delays while the Hammersmith & City Line was completely axed due to ‘heat related restrictions’ and there was no Metropolitan line between Baker Street and Aldgate.

Chief operating officer of Transport for London, Andy Lord, said London’s rail network would also be running a reduced service on Monday and Tuesday.

He told LBC: ‘We’re advising all our customers to only travel if their journey is essential, to make sure that they stay hydrated and carry water with them if they do have to travel. Check before they travel because journey times will be extended. We will have reduced services across the TfL network because of the safety restrictions we need to put in place due to the heat.’

Jake Kelly, spokesman for Network Rail, has warned of travel disruption across the country due to the heatwave, and has warned that services returning to normal on Wednesday ‘will depend on the damage that the weather does to the infrastructure’ over the course of today and tomorrow.

In Scotland, speed restrictions are being put in place on key rail routes. Network Rail confirmed train speeds would be restricted between 1pm and 8pm today, which will have an impact on most routes, with a 20mph speed restriction on the stretch of rail between Hyndland and Finnieston in Glasgow, which is thought to be the busiest route in Scotland.

Restrictions will be in place between Glasgow Central and Edinburgh Waverley; Dumfries and Carlisle as well as Glasgow Queen Street and Aberdeen; Inverness; Oban and Fort William and Edinburgh Waverley and North Berwick, with delays of around 10 minutes expected, according to the ScotRail website.

‘We’re certainly seeing people reacting a little bit differently to the heat warnings as though they think that maybe we shouldn’t be telling them to worry about heat the way we tell them to worry about storm or wind.

‘These temperatures are unprecedented in the UK and we’re not used to dealing with them. And heat undoubtedly causes many hundreds, thousands of excess deaths in heatwaves, so people do need to take care and follow the advice we’ve been putting out about keeping in the shade, keeping cool, keeping hydrated, and so on.’

She also said that, while extreme temperatures remain ‘rare’, by 2100 temperatures like those expected this week could be seen in the UK as frequently as once in every three years as a result of climate change.

‘These temperatures are unattainable in the UK without climate change, they just don’t appear in the ensembles at all. They’re still rare in today’s 1.1 – 1.2-degree warmed climate, but by 2100, we’re expecting them to be anywhere between one in 15 and one in three years, depending on the emissions pathways we take between now and then.’

She added: ‘We will certainly need to make changes to our infrastructure, transport, hospitals, care, homes, all those sorts of things, as well as to our domestic building designs. So yes, we need to make short-term changes for things like cooling centres and then longer-term changes, as well as assuming the very good progress we’ve already made as a nation towards net zero.’

It comes after the Met Office revealed the deep red colour showing the high temperatures on weather maps was part of a redesign in autumn 2021 that was actually intended for parts of the Middle East and North Africa.

Chief meteorologist at the Met Office Paul Davies warned that tonight will be very hot and it will be hard to sleep in the heat. He told Sky News: ‘Tonight will be very oppressive, I mean it’s actually difficult sleeping conditions.

‘And tomorrow is the day where we are really concerned about a good chance now of hitting 40C or 41C, and with that all the health conditions that come with those higher temperatures.’

He also claimed that the rise in temperature is ‘entirely consistent’ with climate change and said the ‘brutality’ of the heat could become commonplace by the end of the century.

Mr Davies told Sky News the weather charts he had seen today were ‘astounding’ and unlike any he had observed throughout his 30-year career.

‘This is entirely consistent with climate change. To get 40 degrees in the UK we need that additional boost from human-induced climate,’ he said. ‘Well, I’ve been a meteorologist for about 30 years and I’ve never seen the charts I’ve seen today.

‘And the speed at which we are seeing these exceptionally high temperatures is broadly in line with what we were saying but to be honest, as a meteorologist, to see the brutality of the heat we’re expecting tomorrow, is quite astounding. And it does worry me a lot and my colleagues here at the Met Office that this sort of unprecedented heat could become a regular occurrence by the end of the century.’

And Mr Davies said that even colleagues in hot countries like Spain and Portugal had described the scenes in the UK as ‘exceptional’.

The top forecaster said a ‘plume’ of heat pushing across Europe was affecting Britain differently. A combination of that plume and human activity generating its own heat is contributing to the high temperatures, he said.

A woman stays hydrated while commuting on the Jubilee line in London this morning as people travel to work

Commuters use umbrellas on London Bridge today as they feel the heat this morning amid the extreme weather conditions
Commuters wait for a Jubilee line train at London Bridge station this morning as they travel to work

Commuters cross London Bridge this morning amid the extreme temperatures affecting the capital today

Commuters cross London Bridge this morning amid the extreme temperatures affecting the capital today

A woman takes an early morning dip at the Serpentine in London's Hyde Park this morning as temperatures are set to hit 40C

A woman takes an early morning dip at the Serpentine in London’s Hyde Park this morning as temperatures are set to hit 40C
Commuters on board a Jubilee line train on the London Underground wait for the doors to close this morning

A woman prepares to enter the water at Penzance in Cornwall this morning amid the extreme temperatures

A woman prepares to enter the water at Penzance in Cornwall this morning amid the extreme temperatures

A packed platform at Victoria station in London this morning as people wait for District and Circle line trains

A packed platform at Victoria station in London this morning as people wait for District and Circle line trains

People walk along Bournemouth beach in Dorset this morning as the heatwave continues

People walk along Bournemouth beach in Dorset this morning as the heatwave continues
Commuters wait for a Jubilee line train at London Bridge station this morning as they travel to work
A jogger makes her way through a park in London this morning as temperatures are set to rise to 40C today
Commuters arrive at London Victoria this morning as people endure a sweltering journey to work
Commuters cross London Bridge today in the early morning heat on an exceptionally hot day
Commuters wait for their Southern train service towards London Victoria station this morning
Commuters cross London Bridge today as the Shard reflects the sun in the early morning heat
A woman uses a water bottle as she crosses London Bridge today in the extreme temperatures
Commuters walk past a message board warning people of disruption over extreme heat at London Victoria station today

A sign at London Bridge station warning commuters about the 'extremely hot weather' today

A sign at London Bridge station warning commuters about the ‘extremely hot weather’ today
Commuters cross London Bridge today as the Shard reflects the sun in the early morning heat
Commuters wait for their trains at London Victoria train station this morning

Commuters wait for their train into London Victoria station this morning amid disruption warnings over extreme heat

Commuters wait for their train into London Victoria station this morning amid disruption warnings over extreme heat

‘I was talking to my colleagues in Spain, Portugal and France over the weekend and they described this heat as exceptional too, and they’ve seen and observed amazing temperatures and, as I say, the brutality of that impact.

Freezers lose power at Tesco as workers have to quickly take out stock

Staff at a Tesco supermarket had to quickly move the fridge and freezer food amid the extreme hot weather after there was a power cut at the supermarket.

They had to clear all the items in the fridge and freezer aisles after the store in Bar Hill, Cambridge, lost power late yesterday afternoon.

Shoppers were unable to buy any ice cream or ice lollies or stock up on frozen burgers and sausages for their barbecues after the aisles were emptied.

Freezer and chiller cabinets are quickly emptied by staff at Tesco near Cambridge after a power cut yesterday afternoon

Freezer and chiller cabinets are quickly emptied by staff at Tesco near Cambridge after a power cut yesterday afternoon

Mr Davies also said temperatures will ease from next Wednesday onwards but warned another heatwave later in summer could not be ruled out.

Mr Davies told Sky News: ‘When we look to the future in terms of the next week, there is an easier time because in fact the temperatures start to ease back to what we describe as slightly above normal from about Wednesday onwards.

‘But as we move into all this, you just can’t rule out another plume.’

He added that holiday-goers should also check the weather overseas because the heat is likely to be ‘sustainable and pretty intense’ over the course of the month.

And the chief executive of the NHS Confederation said the ‘crumbling’ NHS estate is full of buildings that cannot adapt to the challenges of the heatwave,.

While the majority of GP surgeries remained open, one known to have closed today was the Knebworth Surgery in Hertfordshire which shut a site in Stevenage because it has no air conditioning.

Matthew Taylor told Sky News the health service will ‘pull out all the stops’ to keep running over the coming days but warned that ongoing ‘capacity issues’ will make it harder to bounce back.

‘We’ve been given advice in the NHS, we’ll do all that we can, but the problem is this is about resilience, isn’t it?

‘And the NHS has more than 2,000 vacancies, it’s got an estate that is crumbling, so many are not the kind of buildings that have got the adaptability to these kinds of challenges.

‘We’ll do our best but, as we learned during Covid, what’s really important is that we have resilient public services that have the capacity to respond to problems like this, and the NHS will absolutely pull out all the stops and will do all it can, but to be truly resilient we have to address those capacity issues.’

Also today, a Cabinet minister suggested people should ‘just take it easy’ during the heatwave, and could go to the beach to avoid the worst of the ‘ferocious’ heat.

People walk onto Bournemouth beach in Dorset this morning as the heatwave continues

People relax on Bournemouth beach in Dorset this morning as the heatwave continues

People relax on Bournemouth beach in Dorset this morning as the heatwave continues

People relax on Bournemouth beach in Dorset this morning as the heatwave continues

People relax on Bournemouth beach in Dorset this morning as the heatwave continues

People relax on Bournemouth beach in Dorset this morning as the heatwave continues

People relax on Bournemouth beach in Dorset this morning as the heatwave continues
A woman cycles along the promenade at Bournemouth beach in Dorset this morning as the heatwave continues

People relax on Bournemouth beach in Dorset this morning as the heatwave continues

People relax on Bournemouth beach in Dorset this morning as the heatwave continues
People rest in a car park next to Bournemouth beach in Dorset this morning as the heatwave continues
People relax on Bournemouth beach in Dorset this morning as the heatwave continues
People relax on Bournemouth beach in Dorset this morning as the heatwave continues
People relax on Bournemouth beach in Dorset this morning as the heatwave continues
People relax on Bournemouth beach in Dorset this morning as the heatwave continues

People rest in a car park next to Bournemouth beach in Dorset this morning as the heatwave continues

People rest in a car park next to Bournemouth beach in Dorset this morning as the heatwave continues
Tents on Bournemouth beach in Dorset this morning as the heatwave continues
Chairs on Bournemouth beach in Dorset this morning as the heatwave continues

How to manage with extreme temperatures during the heatwave

Health experts have shared advice on how to cope as the Met Office warns lives could be at risk during expected record-breaking hot weather.

Here is everything you need to know about coping during the heatwave, from keeping your pets cool to making sure you are drinking enough water.

– How can I get to sleep when my bedroom feels like a sauna?

Getting to sleep during a heatwave can seem like an impossible task, particularly when you don’t have access to air conditioning – but there are steps you can take to get a good night’s sleep.

Julie Gooderick, an ‘extreme environments’ expert at the University of Brighton, says it is key to set your environment before sleeping.

The ideal room temperature for sleeping is around 18-21C, she says, and to avoid your bedroom becoming too hot she advises using fans, opening windows at night, and keeping curtains closed during the day.

She also advises using a thin sheet instead of your regular duvet, avoiding napping during the day, and cooling your body down as much as possible – this can be done using cooling pads, a cold shower, or even putting your pyjamas in the freezer a few hours before bedtime.

– How can I look after my body?

Extreme hot weather poses the risk of conditions such as heatstroke and heat exhaustion, which can sometimes be fatal. Each year, the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) sees excess deaths during periods of extreme hot weather.

Make sure you are drinking plenty of fluids and try to avoid the sun (and physical exertion outdoors) between 11am and 3pm, when the sun is strongest.

The UKHSA advises people to walk in the shade, apply sunscreen regularly, and wear a wide-brimmed hat in the heat, and to make sure fridges and freezers are working properly.

– Who is most vulnerable in the heat, and how should I look out for them?

Some people are more vulnerable than others in the heat, particularly those who are aged 75 or older, people with serious health conditions, and those who are unable to keep themselves cool.

Ensure you check in on those who live alone, and be aware of the symptoms of heat exhaustion – these can include dizziness and confusion, a headache and a high temperature.

If you notice someone is experiencing the symptoms of heat exhaustion, they need to be cooled down – make sure they are drinking enough water, lie them down and move them to a cold place if possible.

– How should I keep my baby cool in the hot weather?

It is essential to avoid babies becoming dehydrated and overexposed to sunlight – regularly apply sunscreen with a protection factor (SPF) of at least 30, and keep their faces cool with a wide-brimmed sun hat.

Babies less than six months old should be kept out of direct sunlight, the NHS says, and older babies should also be kept out of the sun as much as possible.

Sleep consultant and CEO of Just Chill Mama, Rosey Davidson, advises putting bottles of frozen water in front of a fan to achieve ‘a mini air con solution’ to help babies sleep when it is hot outside.

‘You can also hang a wet towel over a chair – pre-freezing this in your freezer helps – the evaporating water cools the air,’ she adds. ‘If it is very hot in your baby’s room they can just sleep in a vest or nappy.’

– How can I keep my pets cool?

Not just babies struggle with the heat – pets are also at risk in extreme temperatures.

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) advises dog owners to walk their pets in the morning or evening when it is cooler, and to ensure they have enough shade and water.

You can also keep them cool with pet-friendly frozen treats, and pet-safe sun cream is also available.

Never leave pets alone in parked cars, and make sure you are aware of the key signs of heatstroke – symptoms in dogs and cats can include panting, diarrhoea and restlessness.

– Should I exercise in the heatwave?

Avoid extreme physical activity during the hottest parts of the day, but there are ways to exercise safely during the heatwave.

Try to do so during the cooler hours – in the early morning or evening – and ensure you take enough water.

Going for a swim can be a good way to cool down, but make sure to do so in safe, lifeguarded sites.

‘People will want to cool down but don’t dive into open water as it’s colder than it looks,’

the London Fire Brigade warns.

‘There is the risk of cold water shock, which can cause your body to go into shock no matter how fit you are.’

‘Lots of people will go about their lives perfectly normally, for example we have said that schools should stay open and kids should go to school, very often they are safer in schools and kids need to learn and schools can look after them and hydrate them and keep them nice and cool.

‘But we just need to be sensible, we have not seen this kind of heat before in this country.’

Mr Malthouse defended the idea that people could still go to the beach: ‘Some people may wish to. It will be cooler at the coast than it is at the centre of the country, particularly in the Midlands and in London.

‘But what we are saying to people is that they need to take responsibility for themselves, recognise that this is a really ferocious heat that we haven’t seen in this country before and adapt their behaviour accordingly.’

Mr Malthouse also defended Boris Johnson’s decision not to attend a Cobra meeting on the heatwave and instead spend the weekend having a party at Chequers.

He said:

‘It’s my job to chair Cobra meetings. I briefed him yesterday morning at about 8am personally.’

As the broadcaster showed aerial footage of Mr Johnson with his guests at Chequers, Mr Malthouse said it was ‘completely unfair’ to suggest that the Prime Minister was ducking important meetings because he would be leaving the job soon.

But Labour frontbencher Lisa Nandy accused Mr Johnson and his ministers of having ‘clocked off’ during the UK’s first red extreme heat warning.

The shadow levelling up secretary told Sky News: ‘We think the Government ought to do a number of things: first is to turn up to work.’

She said the Prime Minister has ‘clearly clocked off’, adding:

‘And so have many of his ministers in his Government.’

Ms Nandy argued there should be a dedicated Cabinet Office minister to co-ordinate an emergency response and she urged Whitehall to work with local areas to ensure resilience plans are in place to end the current ‘patchwork’ approach.

Meanwhile Mr Malthouse also urged people to ‘look out for those groups who are most vulnerable to the heat’ – particularly small children and the elderly.

He told LBC Radio that ‘people should do the neighbourly thing’ and check on elderly people living nearby to

‘check they are OK, they’ve got access to water, they are keeping themselves cool and looking after themselves’.

‘Hopefully we’ll get through things in good shape,’

he said.

There was likely to be ‘significant disruption’ on the transport network and people should ‘think about working from home’ if they are able to.

He defended the Government’s response, saying the Cobra meetings

‘make sure we are prepared and we are then able to communicate a sensible public safety message’.

Mr Malthouse said France had a heatwave in 2003 and

‘thousands of elderly people did die’ so the UK could ‘learn from that, we are not used to this kind of heat and we just need to make sure that we are sensible and moderate and take care during the next 48 hours’.

It comes after Dominic Raab insisted that it was possible to stay safe and ‘enjoy the sunshine’. The Deputy Prime Minister told Sky News yesterday: ‘Obviously there is some common sense practical advice we are talking about.

‘Stay hydrated, stay out of the sun at the hottest times, wear sun cream – those sorts of things. We ought to enjoy the sunshine and actually we ought to be resilient enough through some of the pressures it will place.’

His message won support from Labour’s education spokesman Bridget Phillipson who said it was ‘right’ that children go to school this week, having missed out on learning during the pandemic.

However doctors have warned that thousands of people – even those who are fit and healthy – could die during the sweltering conditions as the UK Health Security Agency issued its first-ever Level Four heat health warning.

Tracey Nicholls, chief executive of the College of Paramedics, told Sky News: ‘This isn’t like a lovely hot day where we can put a bit of sunscreen on, go out and enjoy a swim and a meal outside.

‘This is serious heat that could actually, ultimately, end in people’s deaths because it is so ferocious. We’re just not set up for that sort of heat in this country.’

Meanwhile, NHS Confederation chairman Lord Victor Adebowale said hospitals are going to be ‘really, really pushed’ during the heatwave.

To illustrate his point, University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Trust yesterday asked people only to attend its emergency department in a ‘life-threatening emergency’.

New Health Secretary Steve Barclay has urged the public to look out for vulnerable relatives and neighbours, adding everyone should take ‘sensible steps in terms of water, shade and cover’.

And Met Office meteorologist Steven Keates advised people to do ‘as little as possible’ in the heat.

They should work from home if possible and ‘minimise physical exertion as much as possible because even fit and healthy people could be adversely impacted by temperatures like this’, he told the Daily Telegraph.

Liz Williams (left), 57, from Bishops Stortford, cooled herself down with a fan as she continued her journey to Farringdon from London Liverpool Street before 8am. Sarah Leitch (right), 26, said:

‘I prefer cooler weather. This is just too hot for me.’

 

Strahila Royachka ,33, who is five months pregnant with her first child, said at Liverpool Street today:
‘The heat is unforgiving’

Commuters cross London Bridge this morning amid the extreme temperatures affecting the capital today

Commuters cross London Bridge this morning amid the extreme temperatures affecting the capital today
A woman takes an early morning dip at the Serpentine in London’s Hyde Park this morning as temperatures are set to hit 40C

Commuters on London Bridge feel the heat at 8.30am this morning as the country experiences extreme conditions

Commuters on London Bridge feel the heat at 8.30am this morning as the country experiences extreme conditions

Commuters wait for a Jubilee line train at London Bridge station this morning as they travel to work

Commuters wait for a Jubilee line train at London Bridge station this morning as they travel to work

A temperature of 30.7C is recorded on the Jubilee line platform at London Bridge station before 8am this morning

A temperature of 30.7C is recorded on the Jubilee line platform at London Bridge station before 8am this morning
Commuters wait for a Jubilee line train at London Bridge station this morning as they travel to work

Commuters cross London Bridge this morning amid the extreme temperatures affecting the capital today

Commuters cross London Bridge this morning amid the extreme temperatures affecting the capital today
Commuters on the Jubilee line this morning amid the hot weather as they make their way to work today
Commuters wait for a Jubilee line train at London Bridge station this morning as they travel to work

Commuters and runners cross London Bridge this morning amid the extreme temperatures affecting the capital today

Commuters and runners cross London Bridge this morning amid the extreme temperatures affecting the capital today
Commuters on the Jubilee line this morning amid the hot weather as they make their way to work today
A jogger runs over London Bridge this morning amid the extreme temperatures affecting the capital today

Commuters on the Jubilee line this morning amid the hot weather as they make their way to work today

Commuters on the Jubilee line this morning amid the hot weather as they make their way to work today

A temperature of nearly 30C is recorded on the Jubilee line this morning on the London Underground before 7am

A temperature of nearly 30C is recorded on the Jubilee line this morning on the London Underground before 7am
Commuters on board a Jubilee line train on the London Underground wait for the doors to close this morning
Commuters on the Jubilee line this morning amid the hot weather as they make their way to work today

After chairing last week’s third emergency Cobra meeting on Saturday, Mr Malthouse echoed the work from home advice.

Water companies report heat-related problems

Water providers are experiencing supply issues due to the hot weather, with some reporting lower pressure levels and others warning of further disruption.

Affinity Water said the heat is resulting in lower water pressure in areas such as London, Essex and Surrey.

The company urged customers to avoid non-essential water usage and said it predicts an extra 164 million litres of water will be needed on Monday compared to normal demand.

‘Because of the hot weather, many of us are using much more water,’ the provider said. ‘This means you may notice lower pressure or no water when demand is higher in your area.’

Anglian Water, which operates in the east of England, said sudden high demand due to ‘extreme hot weather’ is likely a contributing factor in causing interruptions to water supply in King’s Lynn over the weekend.

A spokesman said its teams are working to restore water supplies ‘as quickly as possible’ in some areas of King’s Lynn following a burst water main.

Similar weather-related supply issues are being seen in Bristol, with Bristol Water Foundation warning this week’s heatwave might affect the pressure and taste of its water.

‘With the weather getting warmer, you may experience a drop in water pressure, especially during peak times,’

it told customers.

‘As temperatures rise, water use tends to increase as we all try to cool down with showers, hoses and paddling pools, which increases the demand on our network.’

It said water supplies might be temporarily redirected so customers’ water comes from different treatment works or reservoirs than usual.

‘This may mean you notice your water tastes a little bit different to normal. Don’t worry, though, this will return to normal as temperatures start to cool down again,’

it said.

Meanwhile, South East Water reported supply issues in the Challock and Molash area of Kent on Sunday, caused by an unprecedented amount of water usage.

The company has set up a bottled water station and told customers the continuous hot weather and increased demand for water ‘has put a significant pressure on our network’.

South East Water said: ‘Despite seeing record demands for water, we are currently seeing minimal customers’ supplies interrupted due to hot weather in our water supply region of parts of Kent, Sussex, Surrey, Hampshire and Berkshire.

‘We would like to thank our customers who have been listening to our water efficiency messaging and ask them to increase their efforts to reduce their water use while we move into the hottest period so far.

‘In the villages of Challock and Molash, we have rezoned our water network so some customers will still have a supply of water but there may be a few without so we have set up a bottled water station at Challock Village Hall, which will be open until 9pm.’

‘The heat will affect rails, for example, so the trains have to run slower,’

he said. ‘There may be fewer services. People need to be on their guard for disruption.

‘If they don’t have to travel, this may be a moment to work from home.’

Asked about the advice yesterday, Mr Raab said:

‘That is for employers to consider and people to decide.’ But he said ‘more flexible working’ would ‘help with this kind of thing’.

And more than a dozen train companies are urging Britons not to travel today or tomorrow as the UK’s first red extreme heat warning comes into force.

A total of 21 operators – ranging from Transport for Wales and Gatwick Express to the Transpennine Express and Southern – said they will be running a slower service after National Rail implemented speed restrictions across its network.

Speed restrictions are used by train companies during periods of hot weather to avoid any damage being made to the tracks and to prevent rails from buckling.

Cancellations are also in place as temperatures are predicted to soar. Amber and red extreme heat warnings have been implemented across the nation for the duration.

Those who have to travel are being encouraged to check their journeys on the National Rail website before setting off and taking water with them to stay hydrated.

Refunds are being offered to those who do not travel but have already purchased tickets.

Speed restrictions imposed on trains amid fears of rails buckling in the heat could more than double journey times for passengers, the chief spokesman for Network Rail said.

Kevin Groves told Sky News that trips which typically take two hours could take ‘more than four hours’ as emergency measures have been brought in to prevent trains derailing.

‘Certainly later on today that (buckling) is a strong possibility, which is why, from about midday today through till 8pm tonight, there will be large swathes of England and Wales that will have emergency heat-related speed restrictions placed on the rail network,’

he said.

Mr Groves promised refunds to any passengers who booked journeys today and tomorrow who rearrange travel for later in the week.

‘Our advice to passengers if they can, today and tomorrow, is only travel if it’s really necessary; otherwise try and shift your arrangements to later in the week and you’ll get a full refund,’

he said.

LNER has said no trains are running from south of York and south of Leeds to London Kings Cross tomorrow.

Chief operating officer of Transport for London, Andy Lord, said London’s rail network would also be running a reduced service today and tomorrow.

He told LBC: ‘We’re advising all our customers to only travel if their journey is essential, to make sure that they stay hydrated and carry water with them if they do have to travel.

‘Check before they travel because journey times will be extended. We will have reduced services across the TFL network because of the safety restrictions we need to put in place due to the heat.’

Jake Kelly, spokesman for Network Rail, has warned of travel disruption across the country due to the heatwave, and has warned that services returning to normal on Wednesday ‘will depend on the damage that the weather does to the infrastructure’ over the course of today and tomorrow.

People preparing to enter the water at Penzance in Cornwall today

People preparing to enter the water at Penzance in Cornwall today

People enjoying an early morning swim at Penzance in Cornwall today

People preparing to enter the water in Penzance, Cornwall, today

People enjoying an early morning swim at Penzance in Cornwall today

People enjoying an early morning swim at Penzance in Cornwall today

People preparing to enter the water in Penzance, Cornwall, today

People preparing to enter the water in Penzance, Cornwall, today

People enjoying an early morning swim in Penzance, Cornwall, today

People enjoying an early morning swim in Penzance, Cornwall, today

 

Seagulls on an island in Penzance, Cornwall, this morning

People enjoying an early morning swim in Penzance, Cornwall, today

Speaking to BBC Radio 4’s Today Programme, Mr Kelly said: ‘Our advice very strongly to customers in England and Wales today and tomorrow is to only travel if absolutely essential, and to expect a very reduced train service and delays.

What are Britain’s ten hottest days on record?

1)   38.7C – July 25, 2019

2)   38.5C – August 10, 2003

3)   37.8C – July 31, 2020

4)   37.1C – August 3, 1990

=5)  36.7C – July 1, 2015

=5)  36.7C – August 9, 1911

7)   36.6C – August 2, 1990

8)   36.5C – July 19, 2006

=9)  36.4C – August 7, 2020

=9)  36.4C – August 6, 2003

‘We haven’t taken any of those decisions lightly, but we’ve not been faced with these exceptional temperatures before.’

He added:

‘We’re spending hundreds of millions of pounds a year on making the railway more resilient but ultimately faced with weather like we’ve never faced before, the infrastructure will suffer so we’ve had to put in place arrangements.’

Looking ahead to the rest of the week, Mr Kelly said: ‘We hope and expect to run a full service on Wednesday and beyond, but that will depend on the damage that the weather does to the infrastructure over the next couple of days. We have lots of plans in place to make sure that we can run.’

Commuters braved the ferocious breakfast time heat to travel on public transport despite advice to only travel if essential.

Liz Williams, 57, from Bishops Stortford, cooled herself down with a fan as she continued her journey to Farringdon from Liverpool Street before 8am.

Mrs Williams, an office administration manager, said: ‘I’d prefer to be by a swimming pool but I don’t have a problem going into work. The train journey from Bishop Stortford was okay because the carriages have air-conditioning.

‘But I am dreading the next stage because the Tube is going to be packed with everybody standing so close to each other and sweating and feeling uncomfortable.

By 6.40am this morning London's underground network was reporting heat-related delays

By 6.40am this morning London’s underground network was reporting heat-related delays

Workers need protection from heat, say unions

Unions are stepping up calls to give workers legal protection against soaring temperatures.

With temperatures possibly hitting a record 40C in the next couple of days, unions said there should be a maximum temperature for work.

The GMB suggested it should be set at 25C, saying employers should allow flexible working and travel arrangements, give staff extra breaks and allow them to wear cooler clothes.

Lynsey Mann, the GMB’s health and safety officer, said: ‘This hot weather is great for being on a sun lounger, but if you’re trying to work through it’s no joke.

‘Bosses need to do everything possible to keep workplaces cool and, more importantly, safe.

‘This can be as simple as letting people wear more casual clothing and providing proper hydration.

‘High levels of UV exposure also mean that outdoor workers have a much higher risk of developing skin cancer.

‘Simply allowing more breaks and providing sun cream and protective clothing, such as hats with neck covers, can help reduce this risk.

‘Ultimately, there needs to be a legal maximum working temperature in the same way we have a legal minimum working temperature, and it is in employer’s interests – workers who are overheating aren’t going to be at their best.’

TUC general secretary Frances O’Grady added: ‘We all love it when the sun comes out, but working in sweltering conditions in a baking shop or stifling office can be unbearable and dangerous.

‘Indoor workplaces should be kept cool, with relaxed dress codes and flexible working to make use of the coolest hours of the day. Bosses must make sure outdoor workers are protected with regular breaks, lots of fluids, plenty of sunscreen and the right protective clothing.’

‘I’m just a bit concerned that there may not be trains to get home tonight after work as there has already been cancellations this morning and announcements that there will be cancellations this evening.’

As she spoke, an announcer came onto the station’s Tannoy system saying: ‘We apologise for any cancellations due to the severe weather.’

Sarah Leitch,26, a trainee watchmaker, said: ‘I prefer cooler weather. This is just too hot for me. I know I shouldn’t say this really, but I am ginger and I burn a lot easier than most people.

‘I get sunstroke a lot easier so I have to stay in the shade. This is really uncomfortable weather. But I suppose we just have to make the most of it and get through it. I can’t believe it is going to be 40C plus tomorrow.’

Strahila Royachka ,33, who is five months pregnant with her first child, said: ‘The heat is unforgiving and it is going to get even hotter. ‘

The TV documentary maker added: ‘My company said I could take time off because of the heat, but we are filming today and I wanted to be there.

‘I took a cab from Canada Water to Liverpool Street station. I didn’t want to be on a really hot tube train although people generally give up their seats to pregnant women.

‘I am going to Harlow and the trains are air conditioned so hopefully everything will be okay.’

Abbie Read, 26, who travelled from Westminster, said: ‘It’s a bit worrying that it is going to get even hotter. Most people will be hoping to spend the day in their gardens or inside to keep cool.

‘I have had to travel to be with my five-week-old son who is in hospital and has had heart surgery. I haven’t any choice to avoid the heat.’

Fatima Patel, 25, of Leytonstone, said:

‘I will look forward to getting back home tonight and sitting in a bathtub of ice.’

The AA has meanwhile warned of roads melting and tyres bursting early next week during the heatwave.

Some local authorities have sent out the gritters to put sand on roads to try to prevent the road surface from melting, the association said.

The AA and North West Ambulance Service have been advising that there is a greater danger of tyre blow-outs in extreme temperatures and have suggested drivers check their tyre pressures – when the tyre is cold – before setting off on their journeys.

They have also urged people to drive earlier in the day time to prevent engines from overheating.

Edmund King, AA president, said: ‘The extreme temperatures could be dangerous if you breakdown or get stuck in congestion. Ensure you have enough fuel or electric charge to keep your air-conditioning running.

A person fishes as the sun rises at Mevagissey Harbour in Cornwall this morning

The sun rises in Mevagissey Harbour in Cornwall this morning

The sun rises in Mevagissey Harbour in Cornwall this morning

 

A person stands on Mevagissey Harbour wall as the sun rises in Cornwall this morning

People fish as the sun rises at Mevagissey Harbour in Cornwall this morning

People fish as the sun rises at Mevagissey Harbour in Cornwall this morning

People stand on Mevagissey Harbour wall as the sun rises in Cornwall this morning

People stand on Mevagissey Harbour wall as the sun rises in Cornwall this morning

People fish as the sun rises in Mevagissey Harbour in Cornwall today

People fish as the sun rises in Mevagissey Harbour in Cornwall today

 

The sun rises in Mevagissey Harbour in Cornwall today

The sun rises in Mevagissey Harbour in Cornwall this morning

The sun rises in Mevagissey Harbour in Cornwall this morning

Sunrise this morning in London as temperatures are set to rise to 40C today

Sunrise this morning in London as temperatures are set to rise to 40C today

The sun rises in Mevagissey Harbour in Cornwall this morning

The sun rises in Mevagissey Harbour in Cornwall this morning

The sun rises behind the Gribbin Head Daymark in Cornwall this morning

The sun rises behind the Gribbin Head Daymark in Cornwall this morning

 

Beautiful skies as the day breaks at Dunsden in Oxfordshire this morning

The sun rises on what is set to be a day of extreme heat at Dunsden in Oxfordshire today

The sun rises on what is set to be a day of extreme heat at Dunsden in Oxfordshire today

 

Sunrise in London this morning as temperatures are set to rise to 40C later on

 

The sun rises on what is set to be a day of extreme heat at Dunsden in Oxfordshire today

The un rises over Glastonbury Tor in Somerset this morning ahead of record breaking temperatures in Britain

The un rises over Glastonbury Tor in Somerset this morning ahead of record breaking temperatures in Britain

‘The heatwave could cause considerable problems for many older vehicles without air-conditioning or recent servicing, with both the car and occupants over-heating. Driving outside the hottest part of the day is advisable.

Summer of 99s? Not if councils have a say! Curbs on diesel vans running their engines could make the seaside favourite harder to get, experts warn

The tinkling chimes of a Mr Whippy van have long been a fixture of British summers. But curbs on the vans running their diesel engines to keep the ice cream soft enough to serve could make the beloved 99 harder to come by, it has emerged [File photo]
The tinkling chimes of a Mr Whippy van have long been a fixture of British summers. But curbs on the vans running their diesel engines to keep the ice cream soft enough to serve could make the beloved 99 harder to come by, it has emerged [File photo]

The tinkling chimes of a Mr Whippy van have long been a fixture of British summers.

But curbs on the vans running their diesel engines to keep the ice cream soft enough to serve could make the beloved 99 harder to come by, it has emerged.

Organizers of festivals and fairgrounds are increasingly asking vendors to switch off engines to limit fumes and wasted fuel. Councils are also making similar demands over lucrative pitches in parks and at sea fronts, The Sunday Times reported.

With electric-powered ice cream vans costing as much as £180,000, some traditional vendors fear they will have to ditch Mr Whippy and only stock pre-packaged or soft-scoop ice creams.

Katy Alston, president of the trade body Ice Cream Alliance, said 95 per cent of sales in the blazing heat were 99s.

Ice cream van vendors have also warned soaring diesel costs are putting businesses ‘at breaking point’.

Ms Alston said:

‘The public, and particularly event organisers, believe we should be using electric ice cream vans to be more environmentally friendly.’

But she said electric vans were cripplingly expensive and not fully proven.

Mr Whippy machines can be altered to be electrically powered – Frankie Fernando, 56, has had five of his machines adapted at a total cost of £12,500.

He said the move meant ‘you’ve got no noise, you’ve got no wear and tear of the engine, you’re saving on diesel and it is better for the environment’.

Ice cream van businesses have also warned soaring diesel costs had put the industry ‘at breaking point’ – especially with the most prized pitches costing as much as £25,000-a-year.

Colourful claims that soft mix ice cream technology was devised in part by Margaret Thatcher in her days as a food research scientist have been debunked as a myth.

Mr Whippy ice creams were introduced to the UK in 1958 by businessman Dominic Facchino.

The brand was later bought by Wall’s – now owned by Unilever – although it is now a generic trademark, meaning other suppliers can use it too.

‘Carry plenty of water – at least one litre per person travelling. Keeping yourself and other occupants hydrated can help lower body temperatures in hot weather. If the worst should happen, you can keep yourself and those with you topped up with cool water while waiting for help to arrive.’

Some Britons have been left without water – with Anglian Water apologising for an outage in in King’s Lynn, Norfolk, after a 22inch pipe burst.

Meanwhile the water demand reduction manager for Thames Water, Andrew Tucker, has urged customers to use water carefully, particularly in their back gardens, as the heatwave has led to demand being

‘at near record level’.

Mr Tucker said that Thames Water is not currently considering any water restrictions, but that could change if there is little rainfall in the coming months.

Speaking to BBC Radio 4’s Today Programme, he said: ‘We’re doing pretty well. We know exactly how much water we’ve got in the system, and that’s both in our rivers, the aquifers underground or groundwater aquifers, but also how much we have in our reservoirs.

‘We balance that with how much demand we’re seeing from homes and businesses but at the moment that demand is at near record level, as we were expecting.’

He added: ‘We’re not expecting to need to introduce restrictions on water at the moment. But we know how much water we’ve got, and with people using more at the moment, we are getting through it faster than we would like.

‘If we don’t receive rainfall in the coming months that situation may change but we’re staying on top of it every single day.’

He added: ‘We rely on winter rainfall to recharge rivers and groundwater, so we’re trying to get through that period.

‘We didn’t have the winter rain we wanted, so nine of the past 11 months have been significantly below average rainfall, so it’s a tough place to start. But with everyone playing their bit, we’ll get through this.’

Mr Tucker added: ‘It becomes more difficult month on month, that I guess the peak demand at the moment is extraordinary, there’s no doubt about that.

‘Once we fall back into a normal routine and we understand what customers are doing in homes and businesses just as a normal weather situation, we’ll be in a better position to say how we’re going to stand for the rest of the rest of the year.

‘But we would certainly like rainfall but it’s those little things that people do in the backyards at the moment, those back gardens that really make a difference.

‘So our call is basically ‘stay hydrated, look after your health, but please use water very very carefully and don’t waste it’.’

Additional contingency support for ambulance services, such as more call handlers and extra working hours, have been put in place.

Britons are being urged to stay inside during the hottest points of the day, between 11am and 4pm, and wear sun cream, a hat, stay in the shade and keep hydrated with water.

Emergency services have also urged people to be cautious when cooling off after the body of a boy was recovered in Salford Quays, Greater Manchester, in the early hours of yesterday morning.

A search is meanwhile under way after reports of concern were made for a man seen in a river in Northumberland yesterday.

A North East Ambulance Service spokesperson said:

‘We were called at 4.12pm this afternoon to reports of concerns for someone in the water off Piper Road in Ovingham. We currently have seven resources on scene but are currently unable to provide any further information.’

 

The heatwave dries out Thruscross Reservoir in North Yorkshire while a woman sunbathes on the ground today

 

The country paths are dry and cracked due to the lack of rain in the recent hot spell at Dunsden in Oxfordshire today

 

The heatwave dries out Thruscross Reservoir in North Yorkshire while a woman sunbathes on the ground today

 

The country paths are dry and cracked due to the lack of rain in the recent hot spell at Dunsden in Oxfordshire today

 

YESTERDAY – People swim in the Sky Pool, a transparent acrylic swimming pool bridge that is fixed between two apartment blocks, at Embassy Gardens in South West London on Sunday

Meanwhile binmen in the West Midlands were starting their rounds at 5.30am.

Deputy chief medical officer Thomas Waite said ‘headteachers know their building best’ when asked if the Government supported schools closing down during the heatwave.

Why do rails buckle in Britain – and what about in hotter countries?

Speed restrictions are used by train companies during periods of hot weather to avoid any damage being made to the tracks and to prevent rails from buckling.

Rails in countries typically hotter than Britain are stressed to withstand hotter temperatures, and may adjust their rails between summer and winter.

But Network Rail says variations in short-term weather and long-term climate in the UK ‘mean that it is neither practical nor cost effective to implement these measures permanently on the British rail network’.

Rails in the UK are pre-stressed with a stress-free temperature of 27C, which is the UK mean summer rail temperature.

When the air temperature reaches 30C, the temperature on the rail can actually be up to 20C higher. And when steel rails get hot, they expand, which can cause a buckled rail.

Network Rail says the mass of the sleepers and ballast are designed to contain the forces that make track expand or contract and prevent the track from buckling.

In some hotter countries the forces generated by changes in temperature cannot be contained by sleepers and ballast, so a solid concrete slab is used – but this costs about four times as much to install as standard ballasted track.

Trains are slowed down in very hot weather to reduce the additional forces they apply to the railway, and therefore cut the likelihood of buckling.

The deputy chief medical officer for England added that some children may be able to stay cooler by getting ‘out and about’ and staying well-hydrated.

‘Headteachers know their buildings best and obviously some buildings are easier to keep cool than others. And for many children actually it might be cooler and easier to get out and keep yourself sort of well hydrated and in the fresh air,’

he said.

‘If you’re going to school, there isn’t really a one size fits all as there isn’t for any building. We’re very grateful to the headteachers and headmaster you have on this programme earlier on for the steps they’re taking to keep children safe.’

Dr Waite also said there was ‘no single answer’ to the question of an appropriate temperature for a working environment.

Dr Waite said it was more important for people to ‘adapt their behaviour’ to hotter weather, for example by taking more breaks and keeping hydrated.

‘From a medical perspective there is no one single answer to that. What is more important is people are able to adapt their behaviour when it’s hotter or indeed when it’s cooler,’

he told GMB.

‘That can involve taking more breaks, making sure you’ve got plenty of access to water and shade for people who are working in outdoor environments.’

Dr Waite also said most healthy people will not run into difficulty during the heatwave.

He was asked about comments made by chief executive of the College of Paramedics Tracy Nicholls about the country not being prepared for the high temperatures in contrast to the message from Dominic Raab that Britons should

‘enjoy the sunshine’.

Speaking on GMB, Dr Waite said: ‘Most people who are in good health won’t run into difficulty if they’re taking precautions, that they’re keeping hydrated and they’re keeping cool. Some people, particularly older people, or those who have existing cardiovascular illnesses and also very young children and babies are less able to regulate their heat.

‘So this couple of days, looking out for one another is a really helpful thing to do and making sure that in the longer term that we think about how we prepare for these kind of summers.’

Dr Waite also listed some of the tell-tale signs of heat exhaustion and what can be done to treat the condition.

He told GMB: ‘That combination of fluid loss through sweating and through that hard work through your heart pumping, getting more blood to your skin can lead to a range of symptoms, so you can get sweaty, really quite excessive sweating, cramps, nausea and vomiting and dizziness.

Too hot for sand! Indoor beach shuts because it poses danger to children

A beach is closing today because the sand will be too hot for children to play on.

The man-made attraction at Leicester’s Humberstone Gate has been deemed too dangerous, with funfair rides in the shopping centre also shutting down.

Deputy city mayor Piara Singh Clair said: ‘In these extreme temperatures, the sand on our beach would be far too hot for children to play in. And there’s also a risk that the funfair rides’ generators would over-heat.

The beach at Leicester’s Humberstone Gate shopping centre

‘In the interests of our customers’

well-being, and the safety of our staff, we have decided to close these attractions on Monday and Tuesday.

‘While this extreme weather continues, we would advise people to seek out the shade – and, weather permitting, we hope to reopen the City Beach and the funfair on Wednesday.’

‘If you see somebody who’s experiencing those symptoms, get them into the cool, get them into the shade, give them some fluid to rehydrate, it can be water, it can be sports drinks or rehydration fluids, and most people will make a good recovery in about 30 minutes or so.’

Bedale High School in North Yorkshire is among those shutting today and tomorrow unless children cannot be left at home.

Explaining the drastic move, headteacher Tom Kelly said he was

‘very concerned about the potential for illness and people collapsing in such heat’.

‘Nor do I feel that meaningful work and learning can take place in such circumstances,’

he added.

Asked if she would support parents who decide to keep their children off school on those days, Ms Phillipson told Sophy Ridge On Sunday on Sky News:

‘I think children have missed out quite a lot already in terms of their education and it’s right for them to be there.’

A £2billion spending boom at supermarkets was predicted over the weekend as families stocked up fridges to avoid going shopping during the worst of the heat.

Sales of barbeque supplies, fans and paddling pools surged.

One cinema chain even offered free tickets to red-headed people so they could escape the heat.

But there were fears for the impact on the wider economy from the two-day shutdown.

The Sunday Times reported work by Sandra Batten, a Bank of England researcher, who found when the summers were one degree warmer the economy appeared to grow 0.01 percentage points more slowly.

Temperatures are expected to peak as high as 41C (106F) in parts of central England tomorrow – obliterating the current record of 38.7C (102F) which was recorded in Cambridge in July 2019.

Rising humidity is set to make tomorrow even more ‘oppressive’ than today, Met Office forecaster Becky Mitchell warned.

The UK’s hottest ever night – 23.9C recorded in Brighton in August 1990 – is also likely to be shattered.

According to the Met Office a band of light, thundery showers will usher in cooler weather from Wednesday, although the outlook remains dry with temperatures in the mid to high 20s.

Yesterday, thousands of sunworshippers flocked to packed beaches in Brighton, Bournemouth and Blackpool.

And it was anchors aweigh at the Thames Traditional Boat Festival in Henley, Oxfordshire, which experienced highs of 30C (86F).

But the blistering conditions saw wildfires rage across parts of the country, with one blaze scorching the fields around the Lenham Cross war memorial in Kent.

The hot air mass has spread from the southern Continent, which has seen a record-breaking heatwave and catastrophic wildfires. By last night there had been no fire-related deaths in France or Spain.

But in Portugal, a pilot of a firefighting plane died when his aircraft crashed on Friday.

Ass temperatures remain unusually high, heat-related deaths have soared, with 360 fatalities attributed to high temperatures in Spain from July 10 to 15.

The death of a street cleaner after he suffered heat stroke while working has led Madrid’s town hall to give its street cleaners the option of working in the evenings to avoid the worst spells of the day.

About half of France was under a heatwave warning yesterday, with scorching temperatures expected to climb higher on today.

Meanwhile a fire in La Teste-de-Buch, in the Bordeaux area, had forced 10,000 people to flee at a time when many flock to the nearby Atlantic coast area on holiday.

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